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Title: Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?

Abstract

Solenopsis invicta virus (SINV-1) is a positive-stranded RNA virus recently found to infect all stages of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV-1 and a second genotype have been tentatively assigned to the Dicistroviridae (Mayo 2002). Infected individuals or colonies did not exhibit any immediate, discernible symptoms in the field. However, under stress from introduction into the laboratory, brood death was often observed among infected colonies, ultimately leading to the death of the entire colony (Valles et al. 2004). These characteristics are consistent with other insect-infecting positive-stranded RNA viruses. They often persist as inapparent, asymptomatic infections that, under certain conditions, induce replication within the host, resulting in observable symptoms and often death (Christian and Scotti 1998; Fernandez et al. 2002). The SINV infection rate among colonies was reported to be around 25% in Gainesville, Florida (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV vertical and horizontal transmission were inferred based on RT-PCR detection of virus genome in eggs and successful colony to colony transfer under lab conditions (Valles et al. 2004). However, the exact mechanisms by which the virus is spread from nest to nest in the field are unknown.more » Our results indicate that SINV does not replicate within Pseudacteon decapitating flies that parasitize S. invicta. Flies appeared to develop normally from SINV-infected S. invicta workers. Mechanical transmission of SINV to uninfected ants by oviposition appears unlikely.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, USDA-ARS, 1600 SW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, Florida 32608 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20942939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Florida Entomologist; Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); DOI: 10.1653/0015-4040(2007)90[268:PDFPVO]2.0.CO;2; Refs, 2 tabs
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANTS; DISEASE VECTORS; EGGS; FLIES; GENOTYPE; MECHANICAL TRANSMISSIONS; NESTS; PEST CONTROL; POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION; RNA; VIRAL DISEASES; VIRUSES

Citation Formats

Valles, S.M., and Porter, S.D. Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1653/0015-4040(2007)90[268:PDFPVO]2.0.CO;2; REFS, 2 TABS.
Valles, S.M., & Porter, S.D. Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?. United States. doi:10.1653/0015-4040(2007)90[268:PDFPVO]2.0.CO;2; REFS, 2 TABS.
Valles, S.M., and Porter, S.D. Thu . "Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?". United States. doi:10.1653/0015-4040(2007)90[268:PDFPVO]2.0.CO;2; REFS, 2 TABS.
@article{osti_20942939,
title = {Pseudacteon decapitating flies: Potential vectors of a fire ant virus?},
author = {Valles, S.M. and Porter, S.D.},
abstractNote = {Solenopsis invicta virus (SINV-1) is a positive-stranded RNA virus recently found to infect all stages of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV-1 and a second genotype have been tentatively assigned to the Dicistroviridae (Mayo 2002). Infected individuals or colonies did not exhibit any immediate, discernible symptoms in the field. However, under stress from introduction into the laboratory, brood death was often observed among infected colonies, ultimately leading to the death of the entire colony (Valles et al. 2004). These characteristics are consistent with other insect-infecting positive-stranded RNA viruses. They often persist as inapparent, asymptomatic infections that, under certain conditions, induce replication within the host, resulting in observable symptoms and often death (Christian and Scotti 1998; Fernandez et al. 2002). The SINV infection rate among colonies was reported to be around 25% in Gainesville, Florida (Valles et al. 2004; Valles and Strong 2005). SINV vertical and horizontal transmission were inferred based on RT-PCR detection of virus genome in eggs and successful colony to colony transfer under lab conditions (Valles et al. 2004). However, the exact mechanisms by which the virus is spread from nest to nest in the field are unknown. Our results indicate that SINV does not replicate within Pseudacteon decapitating flies that parasitize S. invicta. Flies appeared to develop normally from SINV-infected S. invicta workers. Mechanical transmission of SINV to uninfected ants by oviposition appears unlikely.},
doi = {10.1653/0015-4040(2007)90[268:PDFPVO]2.0.CO;2; REFS, 2 TABS},
journal = {Florida Entomologist},
number = 1,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}