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Title: Challenge of carbon capture

Abstract

Finding more-effective, less-expensive ways to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by coal-fired power plants could significantly lower the cost of reducing emissions while preserving coal as a vital energy resource. Several technological approaches have been proposed, but all options currently available would, indeed, impose substantial costs and impact plant efficiencies. Ongoing research promises to provide a suite of improved technologies that will give plant owners viable options to meet their specific needs. The article discusses the options for CO{sub 2} capture by precombustion based on IGCC systems, post combustion, or oxyfuel combustion. EPRI's work to develop a process to capture CO{sub 2} using chilled ammonia (rather than the more usual MEA) as a solvent is described. A 5 MW pilot plant is to be built at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant. Other research programs (in Europe and Australia) are also mentioned. Deployment of a new generation of ultrasuperciritcal pulverized coal power plants designed to have greater efficiency and hence lower CO{sub 2} emissions is under development. Efforts to improve precombustion capture are reported in the article. Also noted are two recent studies (one by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R & D Programme and another by CPS Energy) comparingmore » the performance of IGCC and supercritical PC plants incorporating CO{sub 2} capture. 3 figs., 3 photos.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20885844
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: EPRI Journal
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; CAPTURE; CARBON DIOXIDE; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; COAL; COST; ECONOMIC IMPACT; EFFICIENCY; POWER GENERATION; OXYGEN; COMBUSTION; ELECTRIC POWER; PULVERIZED FUELS; COMBINED-CYCLE POWER PLANTS; AMMONIA; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; EPRI; PILOT PLANTS; SUPERCRITICAL STATE; HEAT RESISTING ALLOYS; USA

Citation Formats

Douglas, J. Challenge of carbon capture. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Douglas, J. Challenge of carbon capture. United States.
Douglas, J. Sun . "Challenge of carbon capture". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20885844,
title = {Challenge of carbon capture},
author = {Douglas, J.},
abstractNote = {Finding more-effective, less-expensive ways to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by coal-fired power plants could significantly lower the cost of reducing emissions while preserving coal as a vital energy resource. Several technological approaches have been proposed, but all options currently available would, indeed, impose substantial costs and impact plant efficiencies. Ongoing research promises to provide a suite of improved technologies that will give plant owners viable options to meet their specific needs. The article discusses the options for CO{sub 2} capture by precombustion based on IGCC systems, post combustion, or oxyfuel combustion. EPRI's work to develop a process to capture CO{sub 2} using chilled ammonia (rather than the more usual MEA) as a solvent is described. A 5 MW pilot plant is to be built at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant. Other research programs (in Europe and Australia) are also mentioned. Deployment of a new generation of ultrasuperciritcal pulverized coal power plants designed to have greater efficiency and hence lower CO{sub 2} emissions is under development. Efforts to improve precombustion capture are reported in the article. Also noted are two recent studies (one by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R & D Programme and another by CPS Energy) comparing the performance of IGCC and supercritical PC plants incorporating CO{sub 2} capture. 3 figs., 3 photos.},
doi = {},
journal = {EPRI Journal},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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