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Title: Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip

Abstract

Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan). E-mail: andoh@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
  2. Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20857942
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications; Journal Volume: 351; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.139; PII: S0006-291X(06)02409-0; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; BUDS; PLASMIDS; PROMOTERS; RNA; SCREENING; SIGNALS; YEASTS

Citation Formats

Andoh, Tomoko, Oshiro, Yukiko, Hayashi, Sachiko, Takeo, Hideki, and Tani, Tokio. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.139.
Andoh, Tomoko, Oshiro, Yukiko, Hayashi, Sachiko, Takeo, Hideki, & Tani, Tokio. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip. United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.139.
Andoh, Tomoko, Oshiro, Yukiko, Hayashi, Sachiko, Takeo, Hideki, and Tani, Tokio. Fri . "Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip". United States. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.139.
@article{osti_20857942,
title = {Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip},
author = {Andoh, Tomoko and Oshiro, Yukiko and Hayashi, Sachiko and Takeo, Hideki and Tani, Tokio},
abstractNote = {Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization.},
doi = {10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.10.139},
journal = {Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications},
number = 4,
volume = 351,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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