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Title: Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [5]
  1. Department of Radiotherapy, University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany). E-mail: hchrist@gwdg.de
  2. Department of Radiotherapy, University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)
  3. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)
  4. Department of Biometry, University of Goettingen, Goettingen (Germany)
  5. Department de Cancerologie, Hopital Morvan, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Brest, Brest (France)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20849980
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.03.007; PII: S0360-3016(06)00399-3; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; HEAD; LARYNX; LASERS; METASTASES; MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS; NECK; ORAL CAVITY; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; SURGERY

Citation Formats

Christiansen, Hans, Hermann, Robert Michael, Martin, Alexios, Florez, Rodrigo, Kahler, Elke, Nitsche, Mirko, Hille, Andrea, Steiner, Wolfgang, Hess, Clemens F., and Pradier, Olivier. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.03.007.
Christiansen, Hans, Hermann, Robert Michael, Martin, Alexios, Florez, Rodrigo, Kahler, Elke, Nitsche, Mirko, Hille, Andrea, Steiner, Wolfgang, Hess, Clemens F., & Pradier, Olivier. Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.03.007.
Christiansen, Hans, Hermann, Robert Michael, Martin, Alexios, Florez, Rodrigo, Kahler, Elke, Nitsche, Mirko, Hille, Andrea, Steiner, Wolfgang, Hess, Clemens F., and Pradier, Olivier. 2006. "Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.03.007.
@article{osti_20849980,
title = {Long-term follow-up after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck},
author = {Christiansen, Hans and Hermann, Robert Michael and Martin, Alexios and Florez, Rodrigo and Kahler, Elke and Nitsche, Mirko and Hille, Andrea and Steiner, Wolfgang and Hess, Clemens F. and Pradier, Olivier},
abstractNote = {Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 2000, 37 patients with advanced local recurrences (23 local and 14 locoregional recurrences) of HNSCC without distant metastases were treated in curative intent with organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (before 1994 split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum, after 1994 conventional radiotherapy). Initial therapy of the primary (8.1% oral cavity, 35.1% oropharynx, 13.5% hypopharynx, and 43.3% larynx) before relapse was organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery without any adjuvant therapy. Results: After a median follow-up of 124 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 21.3%, the loco-regional control rate 48.3%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, stage of original primary tumor (Stage I/II vs. Stage III/IV), and patient age (<58 years vs. {>=}58 years) showed statistically significant impact on prognosis. In laryngeal cancer, larynx preservation rate after treatment for recurrent tumor was 50% during follow-up. Conclusion: Our data show that organ-preserving transoral laser microsurgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients who have advanced recurrence after transoral laser surgery and is an alternative to radical treatment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.03.007},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 7
}
  • Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an adjuvant radiotherapy after transoral laser microsurgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and to show that a less invasive surgery with organ preservation in combination with radiotherapy is an alternative to a radical treatment. Patients and Methods: Between 1987 and 2000, 208 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with postoperative radiotherapy after surgical CO{sub 2} laser resection. Primary sites included oral cavity, 38; oropharynx, 88; larynx, 36; hypopharynx, 46. Disease stages were as follows: Stage III, 40 patients; Stage IV, 168 patients.more » Before 1994, the treatment consisted of a split-course radiotherapy with carboplatinum (Treatment A). After 1994, the patients received a conventional radiotherapy (Treatment B). Results: Patients had 5-year locoregional control and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates of 68% and 48%, respectively. The 5-year DSS was 70% and 44% for Stages III and IV, respectively (p = 0.00127). Patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater or equal to 13.5 g/dL before radiotherapy had a 5-year DSS of 55% as compared with 39% for patients treated with a hemoglobin level greater than 13.5 g/dL (p = 0.0054). Conclusion: In this series of patients with advanced head-and-neck tumors, transoral laser surgery in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy resulted in locoregional control and DSS rates similar to those reported for radical surgery followed by radiotherapy. Treatment B has clearly been superior to Treatment A. A further improvement of our treatment regimen might be expected by the combination of adjuvant radiotherapy with concomitant platinum-based chemotherapy.« less
  • Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneousmore » endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V{sub 60}) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 60} greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 65} greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.« less
  • Purpose: To define favorable pretreatment characteristics for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional control, and freedom from distant metastasis for patients with recurrent and second primary head-and-neck cancer treated with concomitant chemotherapy and reirradiation. Methods and Materials: Our study population comprised a subset of 115 previously irradiated patients without overt metastases from 304 poor-prognosis head-and-neck cancer patients treated in seven consecutive phase I-II protocols. Of the 115 patients, 49, who had undergone surgical resection, were treated with a median of four cycles of concurrent chemotherapy and reirradiation and 66, who had not undergone surgical resection, were treated with amore » median of five cycles. The following regimens were used: 5-fluorouracil and hydroxyurea concurrent with reirradiation (FHX) (n = 14), cisplatin plus FHX (n = 23), paclitaxel plus FHX (n = 42), gemcitabine plus paclitaxel and 5-fluorouracil concurrent with reirradiation (n = 26), and irinotecan plus FHX (n = 10). Results: The median lifetime radiation dose was 131 Gy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 67.4 months (range, 18.5-158.7). The median OS and PFS was 11 and 7 months (range, 0.2-158.7), respectively. The 3-year OS, PFS, locoregional control, and freedom from distant metastasis rate was 22%, 33%, 51%, and 61%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified reirradiation dose, triple agent (cisplatin-, paclitaxel-, or gemcitabine-containing chemotherapy), and surgery before protocol treatment as independently prognostic for OS, PFS, and locoregional control. Triple-agent chemotherapy was prognostic for freedom from distant metastasis. Nineteen patients died of treatment-related toxicity, five of these of carotid hemorrhage. Conclusion: For recurrent and second primary head-and-neck cancer, trimodality therapy with surgery, concurrent chemotherapy, and reirradiation for a full second dose offers potential for long-term survival. Owing to the substantial toxicity and lack of an optimal regimen, reirradiation of recurrent head-and-neck cancer should be limited to clinical trials.« less
  • Purpose: Previous analysis of this Intergroup trial demonstrated that with a median follow-up among surviving patients of 45.9 months, the concurrent postoperative administration of cisplatin and radiation therapy improved local-regional control and disease-free survival of patients who had high-risk resectable head-and-neck carcinomas. With a minimum of 10 years of follow-up potentially now available for all patients, these results are updated here to examine long-term outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 410 analyzable patients who had high-risk resected head-and-neck cancers were prospectively randomized to receive either radiation therapy (RT: 60 Gy in 6 weeks) or identical RT plus cisplatin, 100more » mg/m{sup 2}i.v. on days 1, 22, and 43 (RT + CT). Results: At 10 years, the local-regional failure rates were 28.8% vs 22.3% (P=.10), disease-free survival was 19.1% vs 20.1% (P=.25), and overall survival was 27.0% vs 29.1% (P=.31) for patients treated by RT vs RT + CT, respectively. In the unplanned subset analysis limited to patients who had microscopically involved resection margins and/or extracapsular spread of disease, local-regional failure occurred in 33.1% vs 21.0% (P=.02), disease-free survival was 12.3% vs 18.4% (P=.05), and overall survival was 19.6% vs 27.1% (P=.07), respectively. Conclusion: At a median follow-up of 9.4 years for surviving patients, no significant differences in outcome were observed in the analysis of all randomized eligible patients. However, analysis of the subgroup of patients who had either microscopically involved resection margins and/or extracapsular spread of disease showed improved local-regional control and disease-free survival with concurrent administration of chemotherapy. The remaining subgroup of patients who were enrolled only because they had tumor in 2 or more lymph nodes did not benefit from the addition of CT to RT.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in previously irradiated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: In this Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial, 25 patients were treated in five dose tiers up to 44 Gy, administered in 5 fractions over a 2-week course. Response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose standardized uptake value change on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Results: No Grade 3/4 or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Four patients had Grade 1/2 acute toxicities. Four objective responses weremore » observed, for a response rate of 17% (95% confidence interval 2%-33%). The maximum duration of response was 4 months. Twelve patients had stable disease. Median time to disease progression was 4 months, and median overall survival was 6 months. Self-reported quality of life was not significantly affected by treatment. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was a more sensitive early-measure response to treatment than CT volume changes. Conclusion: Reirradiation up to 44 Gy using SBRT is well tolerated in the acute setting and warrants further evaluation in combination with conventional and targeted therapies.« less