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Title: FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

Abstract

Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially moremore » abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)
  2. (United States)
  3. Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) and Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States). E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu
  4. Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) (and others)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20842901
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.01.009; PII: S0360-3016(06)00114-3; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; AIDS VIRUS; BIOPSY; CARCINOMAS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; FLUORINE 18; FLUORODEOXYGLUCOSE; GLUCOSE; LYMPH NODES; PATIENTS; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; SURGERY; THERAPY; UPTAKE

Citation Formats

Cotter, Shane E., Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, Grigsby, Perry W., and Siegel, Barry A. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.01.009.
Cotter, Shane E., Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, Grigsby, Perry W., & Siegel, Barry A. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.01.009.
Cotter, Shane E., Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, Grigsby, Perry W., and Siegel, Barry A. Sat . "FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.01.009.
@article{osti_20842901,
title = {FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma},
author = {Cotter, Shane E. and Medical Scientist Training Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO and Grigsby, Perry W. and Siegel, Barry A.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijrobp.2006.01.009},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To determine an optimal standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold for detecting lymph node (LN) metastases in esophageal cancer using {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography ({sup 18}FDG PET/CT) and to define the resulting nodal target volume, using histopathology as a 'gold standard.' Methods: Sixteen patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent radical esophagectomy and three-field LN dissection after {sup 18}FDG PET/CT and CT scans were enrolled into this study. Locations of LN groups were recorded according to a uniform LN map. Diagnostic performance of different SUV thresholds was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The optimal cutoff SUVmore » was determined by plotting the false-negative rate (FNR) and false-positive rate (FPR), the sum of both error rates (FNR+FPR), and accuracy against a hypothetical SUV threshold. For each patient, nodal gross tumor volumes (GTVNs) were generated with CT alone (GTVNCT), PET/CT (GTVNPET), and pathologic data (GTVNpath). GTVNCT or GTVNPET was compared with GTVNpath by means of a conformity index (CI), which is the intersection of the two GTVNs divided by the sum of them minus the intersection, e.g., CI{sub CT} and {sub path} = GTVN{sub CT} and {sub path}/(GTVN{sub CT}+ GTVN{sub path} - GTVN{sub CT} and {sub path}). Results: LN metastases occurred in 21 LN groups among the 144 specimens taken from the 16 patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.9017 {+-} 0.0410. The plot of error rates showed a minimum of FNR+FPR for an SUV of 2.36, at which the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 76.19%, 95.93%, and 93.06%, respectively, whereas those of CT were 33.33%, 94.31%, and 85.42% (p values: 0.0117, 0.7539, and 0.0266). Mean GTVN{sub CT}, GTVN{sub PET}, and GTVN{sub path} were 1.52 {+-} 2.38, 2.82 {+-} 4.51, and 2.68 {+-} 4.16cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean CI{sub CT} and {sub path} and CI{sub PET} and {sub path} were 0.31 and 0.65 (p value = 0.0352). Conclusions: Diagnostic superiority of PET/CT at an SUV threshold of 2.36 over CT has potential value in nodal target volume definition, but whether this can contribute to better treatment outcomes needs prospective analyses of recurrences in a larger cohort of patients.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDGmore » uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporalmore » PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or support vector machine model. Conclusion: Applying radiomics approach to either midtreatment or post-treatment PET/CT could achieve high accuracy in predicting anal cancer treatment outcomes. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA172638.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging on nodal staging for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with head-and-neck SCC who were evaluated with FDG-PET/CT and went on to neck dissection. Two observers consensually determined the lesion size and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and compared the results with pathologic findings on nodal-level involvement. Two different observers (A and B) independently performed three protocols for clinical nodal staging. Methods 1, 2, and 3 were based on conventional modalities, additional visual information from FDG-PET/CT images,more » and FDG-PET/CT imaging alone with SUV data, respectively. Results: All primary tumors were visualized with FDG-PET/CT. Pathologically, 19 positive and 93 negative nodal levels were identified. The SUV{sub max} overlapped in negative and positive nodes <15 mm in diameter. According to receiver operating characteristics analysis, the size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values were 1.9, 2.5, and 3.0 for lymph nodes <10 mm, 10-15 mm, and >15 mm, respectively. These cutoff values yielded 79% sensitivity and 99% specificity for nodal-level staging. For Observer A, the sensitivity and specificity in Methods 1, 2, and 3 were 68% and 94%, 68% and 99%, and 84% and 99%, respectively, and Method 3 yielded significantly higher accuracy than Method 1 (p = 0.0269). For Observer B, Method 3 yielded the highest sensitivity (84%) and specificity (99%); however, the difference among the three protocols was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Imaging with FDG-PET/CT with size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values is an important modality for radiation therapy planning.« less
  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established method in treatment of patients with lung carcinomas who are not candidates for surgical resection. Usually computed tomographic (CT) guidance is used for the procedure, thus enabling needle placement and permitting evaluation of complications such as pneumothorax and bleeding. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is generally used for tumor activity assessment and is therefore useful in follow-up after tumor treatment. A method that provides real-time image-based monitoring of RFA to ensure complete tumor ablation would be a valuable tool. In this report, we describe the behavior of preinjected FDG during PET CT-guidedmore » RFA of a non-small-cell lung carcinoma and discuss the value of FDG as a tool to provide intraprocedure monitor ablation. The size and the form of the activity changed during ablation. Ablation led to increase of the size and blurring and irregularity of the contour compared to pretreatment imaging. The maximal standardized uptake value decreased only slightly during the procedure. Therefore, before RFA, FDG PET can guide initial needle placement, but it does not serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate residual viable tissue during the procedure.« less