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Title: Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland

Abstract

This report provides a detailed look at the influence of the six highest emitting power plants in Maryland on air pollution and health within the state and elsewhere, based on a previously published regional analysis and previous national-scale modeling efforts. The focus is on fine particulate matter, since studies have shown that respiratory and cardiovascular health are likely to be affected by PM2.5 at current outdoor levels in Maryland. The study was requested by the Maryland Nurses Association. The models determined that the six power plants combined contribute approximately 0.2-1.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of annual average PM2.5 in Maryland, with the impact varying across the state based on proximity to the various plants. While this only represents a fraction of current outdoor concentrations, this increment may be significant in determining non-attainment status in some locations, and the public health impacts remain potentially important. Looking at each plant individually, the impacts typically exhibit spatial patterns in which the maximum concentration impact occurs in relatively close proximity to the power plant. Considering health outcomes based on current population estimates, the six power plants together have an annual impact in Maryland of approximately 100 premature deaths, 4,000 asthma attacks, and over 100,000 person-days withmore » minor restrictions in activity, among other health outcomes. These findings emphasize the importance of considering local, regional and national sources of PM2.5 when developing emission control strategies. 16 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Harvard School of Public Health (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Maryland Nurses Association, Baltimore, MD (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
20813124
Resource Type:
Miscellaneous
Resource Relation:
Other Information: IEACR LIB
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; MARYLAND; USA; PARTICULATES; AIR POLLUTION; PARTICLE SIZE; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; MORTALITY; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DISEASES; COAL; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; HEALTH HAZARDS; ASTHMA

Citation Formats

Levy, J., Winkler, M., and Winkler, C. Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Levy, J., Winkler, M., & Winkler, C. Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland. United States.
Levy, J., Winkler, M., and Winkler, C. Wed . "Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20813124,
title = {Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland},
author = {Levy, J. and Winkler, M. and Winkler, C.},
abstractNote = {This report provides a detailed look at the influence of the six highest emitting power plants in Maryland on air pollution and health within the state and elsewhere, based on a previously published regional analysis and previous national-scale modeling efforts. The focus is on fine particulate matter, since studies have shown that respiratory and cardiovascular health are likely to be affected by PM2.5 at current outdoor levels in Maryland. The study was requested by the Maryland Nurses Association. The models determined that the six power plants combined contribute approximately 0.2-1.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of annual average PM2.5 in Maryland, with the impact varying across the state based on proximity to the various plants. While this only represents a fraction of current outdoor concentrations, this increment may be significant in determining non-attainment status in some locations, and the public health impacts remain potentially important. Looking at each plant individually, the impacts typically exhibit spatial patterns in which the maximum concentration impact occurs in relatively close proximity to the power plant. Considering health outcomes based on current population estimates, the six power plants together have an annual impact in Maryland of approximately 100 premature deaths, 4,000 asthma attacks, and over 100,000 person-days with minor restrictions in activity, among other health outcomes. These findings emphasize the importance of considering local, regional and national sources of PM2.5 when developing emission control strategies. 16 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

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  • This report estimates the avoidable health effects of each of a series of alternative regulatory scenarios for power plants, focusing on the adverse human health effects due to exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) This report uses the same analytical methods that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency used in 2003 to prepare an analysis of the potential health effects of the proposed Clear Skies Act (EPA 2003). This report conducts an analysis of the impacts in 2010 and 2020 of three policy alternatives to the proposed Clear Skies Act, The Jeffords/Lieberman/Collins 'The Clean Power Act', S. 366, and the EPAmore » August 2001 Straw Proposal (one of several alternatives EPA analyzed prior to the announcement of the Clear Skies Initiative in 2002). The report also examines the health impacts associated with the total emissions from coal fired electricity generating units in 2010. Chapter 2 describes the emissions inventory estimates, and the changes in the emissions associated with each scenario analyzed. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to estimate changes in particulate matter concentrations. Chapter 4 describes general issues arising in estimating and valuing changes in adverse health effects associated with changes in particulate matter. Chapter 5 describes in some detail the methods used for estimating and valuing adverse health effects, and Chapter 6 presents the results of these analyses. Chapter 7 presents estimates of the impact of these alternative policy options on the PM non-attainment status. 117 refs., 21 figs., 32 tabs., 3 apps.« less
  • This study examines issues associated with the measurement of a form of particulate matter (PM), referenced as condensable PM, that currently is not accounted for in the quantification of PM stack emissions from Maryland power plants. This study also explores the potential ramifications for future Prevention of Significant Deterioration permitting projects if condensable PM emissions are to be included as part of the total PM stack emissions.
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