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Title: High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of high-dose proton beam therapy (PBT) for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 37 patients were treated in our institution. The indications for PBT were pathologically proven NSCLC, clinical Stage I, tumor size {<=}5 cm, medically inoperable or refusal of surgery, and written informed consent. A total dose of 70-94 Gy{sub E} was delivered in 20 fractions (3.5-4.9 Gy{sub E} per fraction). Results: Patient characteristics (number of patients) were as follows: Stage IA/IB, 17 of 20; medically inoperable/refusal of surgery, 23/14; total dose 70/80/88/94 Gy{sub E}, 3/17/16/1. With a median follow-up period of 24 months, the 2-year local progression-free and overall survival rates were 80% and 84%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional relapse-free survival rates in Stage IA and Stage IB were 79% and 60%, respectively. No serious acute toxicity was observed. Late Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities were observed in 3 patients each. Of these 6 patients, 5 had Stage IB disease. Conclusions: Proton beam therapy is a promising treatment modality for Stage I NSCLC, though locoregional relapse and late pulmonary toxicities in Stage IB patients were substantial. Further investigation of PBT for Stagemore » I NSCLC is warranted.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). E-mail: knihei@east.ncc.go.jp
  2. Radiation Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793463
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 65; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.10.031; PII: S0360-3016(05)02954-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CARCINOMAS; LUNGS; PATIENTS; PROTON BEAMS; RADIATION DOSES; RADIOTHERAPY; SAFETY; SURGERY; TOXICITY

Citation Formats

Nihei, Keiji, Ogino, Takashi, Ishikura, Satoshi, and Nishimura, Hideki. High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Nihei, Keiji, Ogino, Takashi, Ishikura, Satoshi, & Nishimura, Hideki. High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Nihei, Keiji, Ogino, Takashi, Ishikura, Satoshi, and Nishimura, Hideki. Mon . "High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
@article{osti_20793463,
title = {High-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer},
author = {Nihei, Keiji and Ogino, Takashi and Ishikura, Satoshi and Nishimura, Hideki},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of high-dose proton beam therapy (PBT) for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2003, 37 patients were treated in our institution. The indications for PBT were pathologically proven NSCLC, clinical Stage I, tumor size {<=}5 cm, medically inoperable or refusal of surgery, and written informed consent. A total dose of 70-94 Gy{sub E} was delivered in 20 fractions (3.5-4.9 Gy{sub E} per fraction). Results: Patient characteristics (number of patients) were as follows: Stage IA/IB, 17 of 20; medically inoperable/refusal of surgery, 23/14; total dose 70/80/88/94 Gy{sub E}, 3/17/16/1. With a median follow-up period of 24 months, the 2-year local progression-free and overall survival rates were 80% and 84%, respectively. The 2-year locoregional relapse-free survival rates in Stage IA and Stage IB were 79% and 60%, respectively. No serious acute toxicity was observed. Late Grades 2 and 3 pulmonary toxicities were observed in 3 patients each. Of these 6 patients, 5 had Stage IB disease. Conclusions: Proton beam therapy is a promising treatment modality for Stage I NSCLC, though locoregional relapse and late pulmonary toxicities in Stage IB patients were substantial. Further investigation of PBT for Stage I NSCLC is warranted.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 65,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
  • Purpose: To present treatment outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage I NSCLC (11 with Stage IA and 10 with Stage IB) underwent hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 51 to 85 years (median, 74 years). Nine patients were medically inoperable because of comorbidities, and 12 patients refused surgical resection. Histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 6 patients, adenocarcinoma in 14, and large cell carcinoma in 1. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 42 mm (median, 25 mm)more » in maximum diameter. Three and 18 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 50 Gy and 60 Gy in 10 fractions, respectively, to primary tumor sites. Results: Of 21 patients, 2 died of cancer and 2 died of pneumonia at a median follow-up period of 25 months. The 2-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 74% and 86%, respectively. All but one of the irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period. Five patients showed recurrences 6-29 months after treatment, including local progression and new lung lesions outside of the irradiated volume in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 95% and 79% at 2 years, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade {>=}3 was observed. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose proton beam therapy seems feasible and effective for Stage I NSCLC. Proton beams may contribute to enhanced efficacy and lower toxicity in the treatment of patients with Stage I NSCLC.« less
  • Purpose: We update our previous reports on the use of hypofractionated proton beam radiation therapy for early-stage lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had biopsy-proven non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and were medically inoperable or refused surgery. Clinical workup required staging of T1 or T2, N0, M0. Subjects received hypofractionated proton beam therapy to the primary tumor only. The dose delivered was sequentially escalated from 51 to 60 Gy, then to 70 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Endpoints included toxicity, pulmonary function, overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and local control (LC). Results: One hundredmore » eleven subjects were analyzed for treatment outcomes. The patient population had the following average characteristics; age 73.2 years, tumor size 3.6 cm, and 1.33 L forced expiratory volume in 1 second. The entire group showed improved OS with increasing dose level (51, 60, and 70 Gy) with a 4-year OS of 18%, 32%, and 51%, respectively (P=.006). Peripheral T1 tumors exhibited LC of 96%, DSS of 88%, and OS of 60% at 4 years. Patients with T2 tumors showed a trend toward improved LC and survival with the 70-Gy dose level. On multivariate analysis, larger tumor size was strongly associated with increased local recurrence and decreased survival. Central versus peripheral location did not correlate with any outcome measures. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was not found to be a significant complication, and no patient required steroid therapy after treatment for radiation pneumonitis. Pulmonary function was well maintained 1 year after treatment. Conclusions: High-dose hypofractionated proton therapy achieves excellent outcomes for lung carcinomas that are peripherally or centrally located. The 70-Gy regimen has been adopted as standard therapy for T1 tumors at our institution. Larger T2 tumors show a trend toward improved outcomes with higher doses, suggesting that better results could be seen with intensified treatment.« less
  • Purpose: To compare dose-volume histograms (DVH) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by photon or proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms were compared between photon, including three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and proton plans at doses of 66 Gy, 87.5 Gy in Stage I (n = 10) and 60-63 Gy, and 74 Gy in Stage III (n 15). Results: For Stage I, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 31.8%, 24.6%, and 15.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 66 Gy, whereas they were 13.4%, 12.3%, and 10.9%, respectively, with proton withmore » dose escalation to 87.5 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) (p = 0.002). For Stage III, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 54.1%, 46.9%, and 34.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 63 Gy, whereas they were 39.7%, 36.6%, and 31.6%, respectively, for proton with dose escalation to 74 CGE (p = 0.002). In all cases, the doses to lung, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and integral dose were lower with proton therapy even compared with IMRT. Conclusions: Proton treatment appears to reduce dose to normal tissues significantly, even with dose escalation, compared with standard-dose photon therapy, either 3D-CRT or IMRT.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate in a retrospective review the role of proton beam therapy for patients with medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: From November 2001 to July 2008, 55 medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with proton beam therapy. A total of 58 (T1/T2, 30/28) tumors were treated. The median age of study participants was 77 years (range, 52-86 years). A total dose of 66 GyE in 10 fractions was given to peripherally located tumors and 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions to centrally located tumors. Results: The rates (95% confidence interval) ofmore » overall and progression-free survival of all patients and of local control of all tumors at 2 years were 97.8% (93.6-102.0%), 88.7% (77.9-99.5%), and 97.0% (91.1-102.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in progression-free rate between T1 and T2 tumors (p = 0.87). Two patients (3.6%) had deterioration in pulmonary function, and 2 patients (3.6%) had Grade 3 pneumonitis. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy was effective and well tolerated in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.« less
  • Purpose: To compare dose volume histograms of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) with those of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) for the treatment of stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to explore the possibility of individualized radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose volume histograms designed to deliver IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, PSPT at 74 Gy, and IMPT at the same doses were compared and the use of individualized radical radiotherapy was assessed in patients with extensive stage IIIB NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach). These patients were selected based on theirmore » extensive disease and were considered to have no or borderline tolerance to IMRT at 60 to 63 Gy, based on the dose to normal tissue volume constraints (lung volume receiving 20 Gy [V20] of <35%, total mean lung dose <20 Gy; spinal cord dose, <45 Gy). The possibility of increasing the total tumor dose with IMPT for each patient without exceeding the dose volume constraints (maximum tolerated dose [MTD]) was also investigated. Results: Compared with IMRT, IMPT spared more lung, heart, spinal cord, and esophagus, even with dose escalation from 63 Gy to 83.5 Gy, with a mean MTD of 74 Gy. Compared with PSPT, IMPT allowed further dose escalation from 74 Gy to a mean MTD of 84.4 Gy (range, 79.4-88.4 Gy) while all parameters of normal tissue sparing were kept at lower or similar levels. In addition, IMPT prevented lower-dose target coverage in patients with complicated tumor anatomies. Conclusions: IMPT reduces the dose to normal tissue and allows individualized radical radiotherapy for extensive stage IIIB NSCLC.« less