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Title: Clinical experience with a 3D surface patient setup system for alignment of partial-breast irradiation patients

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the utility of surface imaging on patient setup for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Material: A photogrammetry system was used in parallel to APBI setup by laser and portal imaging. Surface data were acquired after laser and port-film setup for 9 patients. Surfaces were analyzed in comparison to a reference surface from the first treatment session by use of rigid transformations. The surface model after laser setup was used in a simulated photogrammetry setup procedure. In addition, breathing data were acquired by surface acquisition at a frame rate of 7 Hz. Results: Mean 3D displacement was 7.3 mm (SD, 4.4 mm) and 7.6 mm (SD, 4.2 mm) for laser and port film, respectively. Simulated setup with the photogrammetry system yielded mean displacement of 1 mm (SD, 1.2 mm). Distance analysis resulted in mean distances of 3.7 mm (SD, 4.9 mm), 4.3 mm (SD, 5.6 mm), and 1.6 mm (SD, 2.4 mm) for laser, port film, and photogrammetry, respectively. Breathing motion at isocenter was smaller than 3.7 mm, with a mean of 1.9 mm (SD, 1.1 mm). Conclusions: Surface imaging for PBI setup appears promising. Alignment of the 3D breast surface achieved by stereo-photogrammetry shows greater breastmore » topology congruence than when patients are set up by laser or portal imaging. A correlation of breast surface and CTV must be quantitatively established.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). E-mail: c.bert@gsi.de
  2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20793409
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.11.008; PII: S0360-3016(05)02865-8; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ALIGNMENT; FILMS; IRRADIATION; LASERS; MAMMARY GLANDS; PATIENTS; RADIOTHERAPY; RESPIRATION

Citation Formats

Bert, Christoph, Metheany, Katherine G., Doppke, Karen P., Taghian, Alphonse G., Powell, Simon N., and Chen, George T.Y. Clinical experience with a 3D surface patient setup system for alignment of partial-breast irradiation patients. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Bert, Christoph, Metheany, Katherine G., Doppke, Karen P., Taghian, Alphonse G., Powell, Simon N., & Chen, George T.Y. Clinical experience with a 3D surface patient setup system for alignment of partial-breast irradiation patients. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
Bert, Christoph, Metheany, Katherine G., Doppke, Karen P., Taghian, Alphonse G., Powell, Simon N., and Chen, George T.Y. Wed . "Clinical experience with a 3D surface patient setup system for alignment of partial-breast irradiation patients". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1.
@article{osti_20793409,
title = {Clinical experience with a 3D surface patient setup system for alignment of partial-breast irradiation patients},
author = {Bert, Christoph and Metheany, Katherine G. and Doppke, Karen P. and Taghian, Alphonse G. and Powell, Simon N. and Chen, George T.Y.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To assess the utility of surface imaging on patient setup for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Material: A photogrammetry system was used in parallel to APBI setup by laser and portal imaging. Surface data were acquired after laser and port-film setup for 9 patients. Surfaces were analyzed in comparison to a reference surface from the first treatment session by use of rigid transformations. The surface model after laser setup was used in a simulated photogrammetry setup procedure. In addition, breathing data were acquired by surface acquisition at a frame rate of 7 Hz. Results: Mean 3D displacement was 7.3 mm (SD, 4.4 mm) and 7.6 mm (SD, 4.2 mm) for laser and port film, respectively. Simulated setup with the photogrammetry system yielded mean displacement of 1 mm (SD, 1.2 mm). Distance analysis resulted in mean distances of 3.7 mm (SD, 4.9 mm), 4.3 mm (SD, 5.6 mm), and 1.6 mm (SD, 2.4 mm) for laser, port film, and photogrammetry, respectively. Breathing motion at isocenter was smaller than 3.7 mm, with a mean of 1.9 mm (SD, 1.1 mm). Conclusions: Surface imaging for PBI setup appears promising. Alignment of the 3D breast surface achieved by stereo-photogrammetry shows greater breast topology congruence than when patients are set up by laser or portal imaging. A correlation of breast surface and CTV must be quantitatively established.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.1},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Purpose: The Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI; Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA) is a multichannel single-entry brachytherapy device designed to allow dose modulation to minimize normal tissue dose while simultaneously maximizing target coverage. This is the first report on the initial 102 patients with nearly 2 years of median follow-up. Methods and Materials: One hundred two patients were treated at two institutions. Data were collected on eligibility and dosimetry and followed for toxicity and recurrence. Results: The median follow-up is 21 months. Overall dosimetry is outstanding (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.9%, volume ofmore » target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 27.8 mL, and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 14.0 cm{sup 3}). No devices were pulled prior to treatment completion. For patients with a skin bridge of less than 7 mm, the maximum median skin dose was 280 cGy (median percent of target volume receiving 90% of the prescription dose was 95.2%, volume of target receiving 150% of the prescription dose was 25.8 cm{sup 3} and volume of target receiving 200% of the prescription dose was 12.7 mL). For patients with both chest wall and skin of less than 7 mm, the maximum median lung dose was 205 cGy with simultaneous skin dose of 272 cGy. The rate of telangiectasia was 1.9%. Grade 1 hyperpigmentation developed in 10 patients (9.8%) and Grade 2 fibrosis in 2 patients (1.9%). There were 2 symptomatic seromas and 2 cases of asymptomatic fat necrosis (1.9%). Of the patients, 27% were not eligible for MammoSite balloon brachytherapy (Hologic, Inc., Marlborough, MA) and 5% were not eligible for any balloon brachytherapy. The recurrence rate was 1%. Conclusions: The SAVI appears to safely allow an increase in eligibility for APBI over balloon brachytherapy or three-dimensional conformal radiation, highlighting the outstanding device flexibility to maximize the target dose and minimize the normal tissue dose. The device was well tolerated by patients.« less
  • Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years,more » 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the role of cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance for setup error reduction and soft tissue visualization in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients were recruited for the delivery of radiotherapy to the postoperative cavity (3850 cGy in 10 fractions over 5 days) using an APBI technique. Cone-beam CT data sets were acquired after an initial skin-mark setup and before treatment delivery. These were registered online using the ipsilateral lung and external contours. Corrections were executed for translations exceeding 3 mm. The random and systematic errors associated with setup using skin-marks and setup using CBCTmore » guidance were calculated and compared. Results: A total of 315 CBCT data sets were analyzed. The systematic errors for the skin-mark setup were 2.7, 1.7, and 2.4 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. These were reduced to 0.8, 0.7, and 0.8 mm when CBCT guidance was used. The random errors were reduced from 2.4, 2.2, and 2.9 mm for skin-marks to 1.5, 1.5, and 1.6 mm for CBCT guidance in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusion: A skin-mark setup for APBI patients is sufficient for current planning target volume margins for the population of patients studied here. Online CBCT guidance minimizes the occurrence of large random deviations, which may have a greater impact for the accelerated fractionation schedule used in APBI. It is also likely to permit a reduction in planning target volume margins and provide skin-line visualization and dosimetric evaluation of cardiac and lung volumes.« less
  • Purpose: On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides soft tissue information that may improve setup accuracy in patients undergoing accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). We used CBCT to assess the residual error in soft tissue after two-dimensional kV/MV alignment based on bony anatomy. We also assessed the dosimetric impact of this error. Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing APBI were studied as part of an institutional review board-approved prospective trial. Patients were aligned based on skin/cradle marks plus orthogonal kV/MV images registered based on bony landmarks to digitally reconstructed radiographs from the planning CT. A subsequent CBCT was registered to themore » planning CT using soft tissue information. This 'residual error' and its dosimetric impact was measured. Results: The root-mean-square of the residual error was 3, 4, and 4 mm, in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. The average vector sum was 6 {+-} 2 mm. Average reductions in mean dose to the lumpectomy cavity, clinical target volume (CTV), and planning target volume were 0.1%, 0.4%, and 1%, respectively. The mean difference in the clinical target and planning target volumes that received 95% of the prescribed dose (V95) were 1% and 4%. Conclusions: In this initial study with a modest number of patients, the residual error in soft tissue was typically <5 mm, and with the field margins used, the resultant dosimetric consequences were modest. In patients immobilized in a customized cradle, setup using orthogonal kV images thus appears accurate and reproducible. The CBCT technique may have particular utility in patients with larger breast volumes or breast deformations. Further studies involving larger numbers of patients are needed to further assess the utility of CBCT.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system (AlignRT) registration algorithms for head-and-neck cancer patient setup during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients, each undergoing six repeated weekly helical computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment course (total 77 CTs including planning CT), were included in the study. Patient surface images used in AlignRT registration were not captured by the 3D cameras; instead, they were derived from skin contours from these CTs, thereby eliminating issues with immobilization masks. The results from surface registrations in AlignRT based on CT skin contours were compared to those based on bony anatomymore » registrations in Pinnacle{sup 3}, which was considered the gold standard. Both rigid and nonrigid types of setup errors were analyzed, and the effect of tumor shrinkage was investigated. Results: The maximum registration errors in AlignRT were 0.2 Degree-Sign for rotations and 0.7 mm for translations in all directions. The rigid alignment accuracy in the head region when applied to actual patient data was 1.1 Degree-Sign , 0.8 Degree-Sign , and 2.2 Degree-Sign in rotation and 4.5, 2.7, and 2.4 mm in translation along the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes at 90% confidence level. The accuracy was affected by the patient's weight loss during treatment course, which was patient specific. Selectively choosing surface regions improved registration accuracy. The discrepancy for nonrigid registration was much larger at 1.9 Degree-Sign , 2.4 Degree-Sign , and 4.5 Degree-Sign and 10.1, 11.9, and 6.9 mm at 90% confidence level. Conclusions: The 3D surface imaging system is capable of detecting rigid setup errors with good accuracy for head-and-neck cancer. Further investigations are needed to improve the accuracy in detecting nonrigid setup errors.« less