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Title: Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd

Abstract

The author demonstrates how emissions trading became an attractive alternative to command-and-control policies that would have required the EPA to disallow the opening of new plants in the middle of the recession-burdened 1970s. His examination of the evolution of this system includes, among other applications, the largest multinational trading system ever conceived, the European Union's Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Scheme (EUETG), and the use of emissions trading in the Kyoto Protocol.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Colby College, Waterville, ME (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20790704
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EMISSIONS TRADING; USA; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; GREENHOUSE GASES; MITIGATION; EUROPEAN UNION; KYOTO PROTOCOL; CARBON DIOXIDE; ECONOMICS; ALLOCATIONS; MARKET; MONITORING; ENFORCEMENT; COST; LICENSES

Citation Formats

Tietenberg, T.H. Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Tietenberg, T.H. Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd. United States.
Tietenberg, T.H. Wed . "Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20790704,
title = {Emissions trading: principles and practice. 2nd},
author = {Tietenberg, T.H.},
abstractNote = {The author demonstrates how emissions trading became an attractive alternative to command-and-control policies that would have required the EPA to disallow the opening of new plants in the middle of the recession-burdened 1970s. His examination of the evolution of this system includes, among other applications, the largest multinational trading system ever conceived, the European Union's Greenhouse Gas Emission Trading Scheme (EUETG), and the use of emissions trading in the Kyoto Protocol.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Feb 15 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Book:
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