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Title: Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies

Abstract

Purpose: To estimate the maximum tolerated dose of hyperfractionated total marrow irradiation (TMI) as a second consolidation after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous or syngeneic blood stem cell transfusion for patients with bone/bone marrow-based malignant disease. Patients and Methods: Fifty-seven patients aged 3-65 years (median, 45 years), including 21 with multiple myeloma, 24 with breast cancer, 10 with sarcoma, and 2 with lymphoma, were treated with 1.5 Gy administered twice daily to a total dose of 12 Gy (n = 27), 13.5 Gy (n = 12), and 15 Gy (n = 18). Median time between the 2 transplants was 105 days (range, 63-162 days). Results: All patients engrafted neutrophils (median, Day 11; range, Day 9-23) and became platelet independent (median, Day 9; range, Day 7-36). There were 5 cases of Grade 3-4 regimen-related pulmonary toxicity, 1 at 12 Gy, and 4 at 15 Gy. Complete responses, partial responses, and stabilizations were achieved in 33%, 26%, and 41% of patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival for 56 evaluable patients are 24% and 36%, respectively. Median time of follow-up among survivors was 96 months (range, 77-136 months). Conclusion: Total marrow irradiation as a second myeloablative therapy is feasible.more » The estimated maximum tolerated dose for TMI in a tandem transplant setting was 13.5 Gy. Because 20% of patients are surviving at 8 years free of disease, further studies of TMI are warranted.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. The Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)
  3. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Clinical Research Division, Seattle, WA (United States). E-mail: wbensing@fhcrc.org
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20788289
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics; Journal Volume: 64; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.06.005; PII: S0360-3016(05)01010-2; Copyright (c) 2006 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BONE MARROW; CHEMOTHERAPY; INFUSION; LYMPHOMAS; MAMMARY GLANDS; NEUTROPHILS; PATIENTS; RADIATION DOSES; SARCOMAS; SKELETON; STEM CELLS; TOXICITY; TRANSFUSIONS; TRANSPLANTS; WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION

Citation Formats

Zaucha, Renata E., Buckner, Dean C., Barnett, Todd, Holmberg, Leona A., Gooley, Ted, Hooper, Heather A. P.A.-C., Maloney, David G., Appelbaum, Frederick, and Bensinger, William I. Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Zaucha, Renata E., Buckner, Dean C., Barnett, Todd, Holmberg, Leona A., Gooley, Ted, Hooper, Heather A. P.A.-C., Maloney, David G., Appelbaum, Frederick, & Bensinger, William I. Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies. United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
Zaucha, Renata E., Buckner, Dean C., Barnett, Todd, Holmberg, Leona A., Gooley, Ted, Hooper, Heather A. P.A.-C., Maloney, David G., Appelbaum, Frederick, and Bensinger, William I. Sun . "Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies". United States. doi:10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0.
@article{osti_20788289,
title = {Modified total body irradiation as a planned second high-dose therapy with stem cell infusion for patients with bone-based malignancies},
author = {Zaucha, Renata E. and Buckner, Dean C. and Barnett, Todd and Holmberg, Leona A. and Gooley, Ted and Hooper, Heather A. P.A.-C. and Maloney, David G. and Appelbaum, Frederick and Bensinger, William I.},
abstractNote = {Purpose: To estimate the maximum tolerated dose of hyperfractionated total marrow irradiation (TMI) as a second consolidation after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous or syngeneic blood stem cell transfusion for patients with bone/bone marrow-based malignant disease. Patients and Methods: Fifty-seven patients aged 3-65 years (median, 45 years), including 21 with multiple myeloma, 24 with breast cancer, 10 with sarcoma, and 2 with lymphoma, were treated with 1.5 Gy administered twice daily to a total dose of 12 Gy (n = 27), 13.5 Gy (n = 12), and 15 Gy (n = 18). Median time between the 2 transplants was 105 days (range, 63-162 days). Results: All patients engrafted neutrophils (median, Day 11; range, Day 9-23) and became platelet independent (median, Day 9; range, Day 7-36). There were 5 cases of Grade 3-4 regimen-related pulmonary toxicity, 1 at 12 Gy, and 4 at 15 Gy. Complete responses, partial responses, and stabilizations were achieved in 33%, 26%, and 41% of patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival for 56 evaluable patients are 24% and 36%, respectively. Median time of follow-up among survivors was 96 months (range, 77-136 months). Conclusion: Total marrow irradiation as a second myeloablative therapy is feasible. The estimated maximum tolerated dose for TMI in a tandem transplant setting was 13.5 Gy. Because 20% of patients are surviving at 8 years free of disease, further studies of TMI are warranted.},
doi = {10.1016/J.IJROBP.2005.0},
journal = {International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • Pulmonary function tests (standard vital capacity, SVC; total lung capacity, TLC; forced expiratory volume in 1 second-forced vital capacity ratio, FEV1/FVC; carbon monoxide transfer factor, DLCO) were prospectively evaluated in patients (median age 25 years, 13-52 years; median follow-up 20 months, 6-51 months) with Hodgkin's disease (15 patients), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (9 patients), and inflammatory breast cancer (3 patients) treated with sequential high-dose therapy comprising the following phases over approximately 2 months: (a) cyclophosphamide (7 g/m2); (b) vincristine (1.4 mg/m2), methotrexate (8 g/m2), and cisplatinum (120 mg/m2) or etoposide (2 g/m2); (c) total body irradiation (TBI; 12.5 gy, 5 fractions overmore » 48 hours), intravenous melphalan (120-180 mg/m2), and transplantation of autologous peripheral blood and/or bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Within 2 months after transplantation, 12 patients also received 25 Gy radiotherapy boost to mediastinum and clavicular regions. In vivo dosimetry evaluations of fractionated TBI treatments showed that mean radiation dose absorbed by lungs was 12.18 Gy (97.4% of TBI dose). Despite such a high radiation dose, we observed only transient and subclinical decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO. The decrease of SVC, TLC, and DLCO was more evident and prolonged in patients receiving radiotherapy boost. All parameters progressively recovered to normal values within 2 years after transplantation. In contrast, FEV1/FVC remained within normal limits in all patients, thus demonstrating the absence of obstructive ventilatory changes. In addition, no interstitial pneumonia was observed.« less
  • The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimalmore » antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate results of high-dose total-body irradiation (TBI) regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,032 patients underwent TBI in one or two fractions before autologous or allogeneic hematologic stem cell transplantation for acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The TBI regimens were normalized by using the biological effective dose (BED) concept. The BED values were divided into three dose groups. Study end points were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed, stratified by disease. Results: In the highest TBI dose group, RI was significantlymore » lower and NRM was higher vs. the lower dose groups. However, a significant influence on RFS and OS was not found. Relapses in the eye region were found only after shielding to very low doses. Age was of significant influence on OS, RFS, and NRM in favor of younger patients. The NRM of patients older than 40 years significantly increased, and OS decreased. There was no influence of age on RI. Men had better OS and RFS and lower NRM. Type of transplantation significantly influenced RI and NRM for patients with acute leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no influence on RFS and OS. Conclusions: Both RI and NRM were significantly influenced by the size of the BED of single-dose or two-fraction TBI regimens; OS and RFS were not. Age was of highly significant influence on NRM, but there was no influence of age on RI. Hyperfractionated TBI with a high BED might be useful, assuming NRM can be reduced.« less
  • We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the bloodmore » by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.« less
  • Purpose: To evaluate survival and neurocognitive outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with central nervous system (CNS) involvement treated according to an institutional protocol with stem cell transplantation (SCT) and a component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in addition to total-body irradiation (TBI) as preparative regimen. Methods and Materials: Forty-one pediatric ALL patients underwent SCT with TBI and received additional cranial irradiation or CSI because of CNS leukemic involvement. Prospective neurocognitive testing was performed before and after SCT in a subset of patients. Cox regression models were used to determine associations of patient and disease characteristics and treatment methodsmore » with outcomes. Results: All patients received a cranial radiation boost; median total cranial dose was 24 Gy. Eighteen patients (44%) received a spinal boost; median total spinal dose for these patients was 18 Gy. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) for all patients was 67%. Those receiving CSI had a trend toward superior DFS compared with those receiving a cranial boost alone (hazard ratio 3.23, P=.14). Patients with isolated CNS disease before SCT had a trend toward superior DFS (hazard ratio 3.64, P=.11, 5-year DFS 74%) compared with those with combined CNS and bone marrow disease (5-year DFS 59%). Neurocognitive testing revealed a mean post-SCT overall intelligence quotient of 103.7 at 4.4 years. Relative deficiencies in processing speed and/or working memory were noted in 6 of 16 tested patients (38%). Pre- and post-SCT neurocognitive testing revealed no significant change in intelligence quotient (mean increase +4.7 points). At a mean of 12.5 years after transplant, 11 of 13 long-term survivors (85%) had completed at least some coursework at a 2- or 4-year college. Conclusion: The addition of CSI to TBI before SCT in pediatric ALL with CNS involvement is effective and well-tolerated. Craniospinal irradiation plus TBI is worthy of further protocol investigation in children with CNS leukemia.« less