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Title: Predicting the amount of carbon in carbon nanotubes grown by CH{sub 4} rf plasmas

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on Si substrates by rf CH{sub 4} plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in a pressure range of 1-10 Torr, and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy. At 1 Torr, the CNTs continued growing up to 60 min, while their height at 4 Torr had leveled off at 20 min. CNTs hardly grew at 10 Torr and amorphous carbon was deposited instead. CH{sub 4} plasma was simulated using a one-dimensional fluid model to evaluate the production and transport of radicals, ions, and nonradical neutrals. The amount of simulated carbon supplied to the electrode surface via the flux of radicals and ions such as CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +} was consistent with estimations from experimental results.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Division of Electronics for Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, N14 W9, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan)
  2. (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20787786
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2150599; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AMORPHOUS STATE; CARBON; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; ELECTRODES; METHANE; METHYL RADICALS; MOLECULAR IONS; NANOTUBES; PLASMA; PRESSURE DEPENDENCE; PRESSURE RANGE KILO PA; PRESSURE RANGE PA; SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; SUBSTRATES

Citation Formats

Okita, Atsushi, Suda, Yoshiyuki, Ozeki, Atsushi, Sugawara, Hirotake, Sakai, Yosuke, Oda, Akinori, Nakamura, Junji, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555, and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573. Predicting the amount of carbon in carbon nanotubes grown by CH{sub 4} rf plasmas. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2150599.
Okita, Atsushi, Suda, Yoshiyuki, Ozeki, Atsushi, Sugawara, Hirotake, Sakai, Yosuke, Oda, Akinori, Nakamura, Junji, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555, & Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573. Predicting the amount of carbon in carbon nanotubes grown by CH{sub 4} rf plasmas. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2150599.
Okita, Atsushi, Suda, Yoshiyuki, Ozeki, Atsushi, Sugawara, Hirotake, Sakai, Yosuke, Oda, Akinori, Nakamura, Junji, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555, and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573. Sun . "Predicting the amount of carbon in carbon nanotubes grown by CH{sub 4} rf plasmas". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2150599.
@article{osti_20787786,
title = {Predicting the amount of carbon in carbon nanotubes grown by CH{sub 4} rf plasmas},
author = {Okita, Atsushi and Suda, Yoshiyuki and Ozeki, Atsushi and Sugawara, Hirotake and Sakai, Yosuke and Oda, Akinori and Nakamura, Junji and Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 and Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573},
abstractNote = {Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on Si substrates by rf CH{sub 4} plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition in a pressure range of 1-10 Torr, and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy. At 1 Torr, the CNTs continued growing up to 60 min, while their height at 4 Torr had leveled off at 20 min. CNTs hardly grew at 10 Torr and amorphous carbon was deposited instead. CH{sub 4} plasma was simulated using a one-dimensional fluid model to evaluate the production and transport of radicals, ions, and nonradical neutrals. The amount of simulated carbon supplied to the electrode surface via the flux of radicals and ions such as CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +} was consistent with estimations from experimental results.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2150599},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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