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Title: Asymmetric optical pulse propagation through a resonant absorber

Abstract

We experimentally measure the propagation delays for chirped optical pulses with asymmetric temporal envelope functions, through a resonantly absorbing dye solution. The transmitted pulses suffer a strong deformation and the arrival times are dramatically modified by the interaction between the chirp and the absorption effect of the sample. It is shown that the arrival time, represented by the centroid of energy of the transmitted pulse, can be well described by the reshaping delay and has a greater significance than the peak of the pulse.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786435
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 5; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.051802; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; ASYMMETRY; DEFORMATION; DYES; LIGHT TRANSMISSION; MATHEMATICAL SOLUTIONS; OPTICS; PULSES; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Talukder, Aminul I., and Tomita, Makoto. Asymmetric optical pulse propagation through a resonant absorber. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Talukder, Aminul I., & Tomita, Makoto. Asymmetric optical pulse propagation through a resonant absorber. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Talukder, Aminul I., and Tomita, Makoto. Tue . "Asymmetric optical pulse propagation through a resonant absorber". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
@article{osti_20786435,
title = {Asymmetric optical pulse propagation through a resonant absorber},
author = {Talukder, Aminul I. and Tomita, Makoto},
abstractNote = {We experimentally measure the propagation delays for chirped optical pulses with asymmetric temporal envelope functions, through a resonantly absorbing dye solution. The transmitted pulses suffer a strong deformation and the arrival times are dramatically modified by the interaction between the chirp and the absorption effect of the sample. It is shown that the arrival time, represented by the centroid of energy of the transmitted pulse, can be well described by the reshaping delay and has a greater significance than the peak of the pulse.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 5,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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