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Title: Single-particle entanglement

Abstract

I give a simple argument that demonstrates that the state vertical bar 0> vertical bar 1>+ vertical bar 1> vertical bar 0>, with |0> denoting a state with 0 particles (or photons) and vertical bar 1> a one-particle state, is entangled in spite of recent claims to the contrary. I also discuss viewpoints on the old controversy about whether the above state can be said to display single-particle or single-photon nonlocality.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies, 600-700 Mountain Ave., Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20786388
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review. A; Journal Volume: 72; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevA.72.064306; (c) 2005 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; ENERGY LEVELS; LOCALITY; PHOTONS; QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT; QUANTUM MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Enk, S. J. van. Single-particle entanglement. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Enk, S. J. van. Single-particle entanglement. United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
Enk, S. J. van. Thu . "Single-particle entanglement". United States. doi:10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0.
@article{osti_20786388,
title = {Single-particle entanglement},
author = {Enk, S. J. van},
abstractNote = {I give a simple argument that demonstrates that the state vertical bar 0> vertical bar 1>+ vertical bar 1> vertical bar 0>, with |0> denoting a state with 0 particles (or photons) and vertical bar 1> a one-particle state, is entangled in spite of recent claims to the contrary. I also discuss viewpoints on the old controversy about whether the above state can be said to display single-particle or single-photon nonlocality.},
doi = {10.1103/PHYSREVA.72.0},
journal = {Physical Review. A},
number = 6,
volume = 72,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 15 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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