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Title: Excitation of nanoscale vapor bubbles at the surface of gold nanoparticles in water

Abstract

Intense nonequilibrium femtosecond laser excitation of gold nanoparticles in water leads to a transient heating of the nanoparticles, which decays via heat transfer to the water phase. It is shown that the water temperature rises to near the critical temperature and the water undergoes an explosive evaporation in the subnanosecond range. The formation of vapor bubbles shows a threshold dependence on laser fluence. The nascent nanoscale vapor bubbles change the heat dissipation drastically. The nanoscale structure is resolved directly with a combination of x-ray scattering methods sensitive to the particle lattice expansion and the change in the water structure factor.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Constance (Germany)
  2. (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20783279
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Chemical Physics; Journal Volume: 124; Journal Issue: 18; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2187476; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; BUBBLES; COLLISIONS; CRITICAL TEMPERATURE; EVAPORATION; EXCITATION; GOLD; NANOSTRUCTURES; PARTICLES; STRUCTURE FACTORS; VAPORS; WATER; X-RAY DIFFRACTION

Citation Formats

Kotaidis, V., Dahmen, C., Plessen, G. von, Springer, F., Plech, A., I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, and Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Constance. Excitation of nanoscale vapor bubbles at the surface of gold nanoparticles in water. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2187476.
Kotaidis, V., Dahmen, C., Plessen, G. von, Springer, F., Plech, A., I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, & Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Constance. Excitation of nanoscale vapor bubbles at the surface of gold nanoparticles in water. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187476.
Kotaidis, V., Dahmen, C., Plessen, G. von, Springer, F., Plech, A., I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen, and Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Constance. Sun . "Excitation of nanoscale vapor bubbles at the surface of gold nanoparticles in water". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2187476.
@article{osti_20783279,
title = {Excitation of nanoscale vapor bubbles at the surface of gold nanoparticles in water},
author = {Kotaidis, V. and Dahmen, C. and Plessen, G. von and Springer, F. and Plech, A. and I. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen and Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 Constance},
abstractNote = {Intense nonequilibrium femtosecond laser excitation of gold nanoparticles in water leads to a transient heating of the nanoparticles, which decays via heat transfer to the water phase. It is shown that the water temperature rises to near the critical temperature and the water undergoes an explosive evaporation in the subnanosecond range. The formation of vapor bubbles shows a threshold dependence on laser fluence. The nascent nanoscale vapor bubbles change the heat dissipation drastically. The nanoscale structure is resolved directly with a combination of x-ray scattering methods sensitive to the particle lattice expansion and the change in the water structure factor.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2187476},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 18,
volume = 124,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Sun May 14 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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