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Title: Laser-induced Ni(Ti) silicide formation

Abstract

Effects of Ti alloying during laser-induced Ni silicide formation is studied. Unique triple layer microstructures were found with the presence of supercell in the NiSi{sub 2} grains formed at the interface. This supercell formation was caused by a local ordering of Ni and Si atoms that favor lower free energy during rapid solidification. Ti rapidly segregates from the alloy melt and forms a protective TiO{sub x} overlayer on the surface during solidification. Melt front progressing towards the Ni-rich region leads to quenching of an amorphous layer sandwiched between NiSi{sub 2} grains and the TiO{sub x} overlayer.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore) and Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)
  2. (Singapore)
  3. (SimTECH), 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20778823
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 11; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2186073; (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ANNEALING; FREE ENERGY; INTERFACES; LASERS; LAYERS; MICROSTRUCTURE; NICKEL ALLOYS; NICKEL SILICIDES; SILICON ALLOYS; SOLIDIFICATION; TITANIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

Setiawan, Y., Lee, P.S., Pey, K.L., Wang, X.C., Lim, G.C., School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, and Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology. Laser-induced Ni(Ti) silicide formation. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2186073.
Setiawan, Y., Lee, P.S., Pey, K.L., Wang, X.C., Lim, G.C., School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, & Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology. Laser-induced Ni(Ti) silicide formation. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186073.
Setiawan, Y., Lee, P.S., Pey, K.L., Wang, X.C., Lim, G.C., School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798, and Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology. Mon . "Laser-induced Ni(Ti) silicide formation". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2186073.
@article{osti_20778823,
title = {Laser-induced Ni(Ti) silicide formation},
author = {Setiawan, Y. and Lee, P.S. and Pey, K.L. and Wang, X.C. and Lim, G.C. and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 and Microelectronics Center, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 and Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology},
abstractNote = {Effects of Ti alloying during laser-induced Ni silicide formation is studied. Unique triple layer microstructures were found with the presence of supercell in the NiSi{sub 2} grains formed at the interface. This supercell formation was caused by a local ordering of Ni and Si atoms that favor lower free energy during rapid solidification. Ti rapidly segregates from the alloy melt and forms a protective TiO{sub x} overlayer on the surface during solidification. Melt front progressing towards the Ni-rich region leads to quenching of an amorphous layer sandwiched between NiSi{sub 2} grains and the TiO{sub x} overlayer.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2186073},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Mon Mar 13 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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