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Title: Sensitive elemental analysis by ArF laser-induced fluorescence of laser ablation plumes: Elucidation of the fluorescence mechanism

Abstract

Numerous atomic analytes in plumes produced by pulsed-laser ablation fluoresced upon ArF laser irradiation. The likely mechanism was photoexcitation to levels near the ionization limit. These levels were dense and were probably broadened by the extreme plume density to allow efficient absorption of 193 nm photons. The excited atoms relaxed to intermediate states as the plume expanded. Interparticle interaction weakened and transitions from these states produced sharp spectral lines for elemental analysis. This ArF-induced fluorescence technique was orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser-induced plasma spectroscopy.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (China) and Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China)
  2. (China)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20776935
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters; Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 26; Other Information: DOI: 10.1063/1.2149983; (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABLATION; ABSORPTION; ARGON FLUORIDES; ATOMS; DENSITY; EXCITED STATES; FLUORESCENCE; INTERMEDIATE STATE; IONIZATION; LASER RADIATION; PHOTONS; PLASMA; PLUMES; SOLID STATE LASERS; SPECTROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Ho, S.K., Cheung, N.H., and Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. Sensitive elemental analysis by ArF laser-induced fluorescence of laser ablation plumes: Elucidation of the fluorescence mechanism. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1063/1.2149983.
Ho, S.K., Cheung, N.H., & Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. Sensitive elemental analysis by ArF laser-induced fluorescence of laser ablation plumes: Elucidation of the fluorescence mechanism. United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149983.
Ho, S.K., Cheung, N.H., and Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong. Mon . "Sensitive elemental analysis by ArF laser-induced fluorescence of laser ablation plumes: Elucidation of the fluorescence mechanism". United States. doi:10.1063/1.2149983.
@article{osti_20776935,
title = {Sensitive elemental analysis by ArF laser-induced fluorescence of laser ablation plumes: Elucidation of the fluorescence mechanism},
author = {Ho, S.K. and Cheung, N.H. and Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong},
abstractNote = {Numerous atomic analytes in plumes produced by pulsed-laser ablation fluoresced upon ArF laser irradiation. The likely mechanism was photoexcitation to levels near the ionization limit. These levels were dense and were probably broadened by the extreme plume density to allow efficient absorption of 193 nm photons. The excited atoms relaxed to intermediate states as the plume expanded. Interparticle interaction weakened and transitions from these states produced sharp spectral lines for elemental analysis. This ArF-induced fluorescence technique was orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser-induced plasma spectroscopy.},
doi = {10.1063/1.2149983},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 26,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 26 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Mon Dec 26 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
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