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Title: Muon colliders

Abstract

Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
  3. BINP, RU-630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation) [and others
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
206947
Report Number(s):
BNL-62740; CAP-1140-Muon-96C; CONF-9510295-13; SLAC-PUB-7119; LBL-38308
ON: DE96006770; TRN: 96:009346
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76CH00016; AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 9. advanced ICFA beam dynamic workshop: beam dynamics and technology issues for Mu{sup +}Mu{sup -} colliders, Montauk, NY (United States), 15-20 Oct 1995; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; 66 PHYSICS; MUON-MUON INTERACTIONS; RADIATION DETECTORS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; ACCELERATORS; COLLIDING BEAMS; MUONS

Citation Formats

Palmer, R.B., Sessler, A., and Skrinsky, A. Muon colliders. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Palmer, R.B., Sessler, A., & Skrinsky, A. Muon colliders. United States.
Palmer, R.B., Sessler, A., and Skrinsky, A. Mon . "Muon colliders". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/206947.
@article{osti_206947,
title = {Muon colliders},
author = {Palmer, R.B. and Sessler, A. and Skrinsky, A.},
abstractNote = {Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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  • The workshop ''Studies on Colliders and Collider Physics at the Highest Energies: Muon Colliders at 10 TeV to 100 TeV (HEMC'99)'' was held in Montauk, NY, U.S.A., from 27 September to 1 October 1999. The goal of this workshop was to provide a first assessment of the long-term potential of muon colliders to explore the basic building blocks of the natural universe. Broad-based in its outlook, it included discussion on the challenges and feasibility of accelerator and detector technologies as well as theoretical speculations and classification schemes for the physics processes that such future colliders might uncover. Forty-six accelerator andmore » high-energy physicists from around the world attended the 5 days of the workshop. Approximately 1/3 of the program consisted of technical evaluations in working group sessions, and 2/3 was for plenary sessions giving non-technical presentations that could be understood across the sub-fields.« less
  • The first section looks at the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron, of lepton and photon-photon colliders for comparison. The second section discusses the physics considerations for the muon collider. The third section covers muon collider components. The fourth section is about the intersection region and detectors. In the fifth section, the authors discuss modifications to enhance the muon polarization`s operating parameters with very small momentum spreads, operations at energies other than the maximum for which the machine is designed, and designs of machines for different maximum energies. The final section discusses a Research and Developmentmore » plan aimed at the operation of a 0.5 TeV demonstration machine by the year 2010, and of the 4 TeV machine by the year 2020.« less
  • Advantages and disadvantages of muon colliders are discussed. Recent results of calculations of the radiation hazard from muon decay neutrinos are presented. This is a significant problem for machines with center of mass energy of 4 TeV, but of no consequence for lower energies. Plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides continued work on the parameters of a 4 TeV collider, studies are now starting on a machine near 100 GeV that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. Proposals are also presented for a demonstration of ionization cooling and of the requiredmore » targeting, pion capture, and phase rotation rf.« less
  • Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling,more » and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.« less
  • A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six ordersmore » of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling ideas and comment on the prospects for a Higgs factory or energy frontier muon collider using existing laboratory infrastructure.« less