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Title: Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine

Abstract

A study of the catalytic activation of charge near the combustion chamber wall and of the flame quenching phenomenon was carried out to identify whether flame quenches due to catalytic activation or due to thermal quenching. It was found that (1) the diffusion rate of fuel into the boundary sublayer limits the catalytic surface reaction rate during combustion; (2) the results of the present flame quench model indicate that the flame quenches due to the heat loss to walls, and the depletion of fuel due to the catalyst coated on the combustion chamber walls does not affect flame quenching; (3) the catalysts coated on the combustion chamber surface do not contribute increased hydrocarbon emissions, but actually reduce them; (4) each catalyst has a specific surface temperature, at which the Damkoehler number for surface reaction is unity.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Automobile Engineering, IRTT, Erode 638 316 (India)
  2. Department of Mechanical Engineering, CIT, Coimbatore 641 014 (India)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20686001
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Combustion and Flame; Journal Volume: 144; Journal Issue: 1-2; Other Information: Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; SPARK IGNITION ENGINES; FLAMES; COMBUSTION KINETICS; CATALYSTS; HEAT LOSSES

Citation Formats

Nedunchezhian, N., and Dhandapani, S.. Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2004.11.007.
Nedunchezhian, N., & Dhandapani, S.. Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine. United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2004.11.007.
Nedunchezhian, N., and Dhandapani, S.. Sun . "Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine". United States. doi:10.1016/j.combustflame.2004.11.007.
@article{osti_20686001,
title = {Study of flame quenching and near-wall combustion of lean burn fuel-air mixture in a catalytically activated spark-ignited lean burn engine},
author = {Nedunchezhian, N. and Dhandapani, S.},
abstractNote = {A study of the catalytic activation of charge near the combustion chamber wall and of the flame quenching phenomenon was carried out to identify whether flame quenches due to catalytic activation or due to thermal quenching. It was found that (1) the diffusion rate of fuel into the boundary sublayer limits the catalytic surface reaction rate during combustion; (2) the results of the present flame quench model indicate that the flame quenches due to the heat loss to walls, and the depletion of fuel due to the catalyst coated on the combustion chamber walls does not affect flame quenching; (3) the catalysts coated on the combustion chamber surface do not contribute increased hydrocarbon emissions, but actually reduce them; (4) each catalyst has a specific surface temperature, at which the Damkoehler number for surface reaction is unity.},
doi = {10.1016/j.combustflame.2004.11.007},
journal = {Combustion and Flame},
number = 1-2,
volume = 144,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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