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Title: Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA

Abstract

Riverine fluxes of several pesticides and other organic contaminants from above the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA, were quantified in 1994. Base flow and storm flow samples collected at the fall line of the river from February to December 1994 were analyzed for both dissolved and particulate phase contaminants. Measured concentrations of the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides varied mainly in response to the timing of their application to agricultural fields. Conversely, the concentrations of the more particle-sorptive contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) insecticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were more directly correlated with river flow throughout the year. Annual fluxes were almost entirely in the dissolved phase for the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides, distributed between the dissolved and particulate phases for the PCBs and OC insecticides, and primarily in the particulate phase for the PAHs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20080485
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: PBD: Apr 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SEASONAL VARIATIONS; CHESAPEAKE BAY; WATER POLLUTION; RIVERS; MONITORING; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION

Citation Formats

Foster, G.D., Lippa, K.A., and Miller, C.V. Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0992:SCOOCA>2.3.CO;2.
Foster, G.D., Lippa, K.A., & Miller, C.V. Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA. United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0992:SCOOCA>2.3.CO;2.
Foster, G.D., Lippa, K.A., and Miller, C.V. 2000. "Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA". United States. doi:10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0992:SCOOCA>2.3.CO;2.
@article{osti_20080485,
title = {Seasonal concentrations of organic contaminants at the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin and estimated fluxes to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA},
author = {Foster, G.D. and Lippa, K.A. and Miller, C.V.},
abstractNote = {Riverine fluxes of several pesticides and other organic contaminants from above the fall line of the Susquehanna River basin to northern Chesapeake Bay, USA, were quantified in 1994. Base flow and storm flow samples collected at the fall line of the river from February to December 1994 were analyzed for both dissolved and particulate phase contaminants. Measured concentrations of the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides varied mainly in response to the timing of their application to agricultural fields. Conversely, the concentrations of the more particle-sorptive contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) insecticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were more directly correlated with river flow throughout the year. Annual fluxes were almost entirely in the dissolved phase for the organonitrogen and organophosphorus pesticides, distributed between the dissolved and particulate phases for the PCBs and OC insecticides, and primarily in the particulate phase for the PAHs.},
doi = {10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<0992:SCOOCA>2.3.CO;2},
journal = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
number = 4,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month = 4
}
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