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Title: Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays

Abstract

The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former wood-treating site was simulated at pilot scale in temperature-controlled sol pans. Nineteen two- through six-ring PAHs were monitored with time (initial total PAHs = 2,800 mg/kg). Twenty-five weeks of treatment yielded a final total PAH level of 1,160 mg/kg. Statistically significant decreases in concentrations were seen in total, two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs. Carcinogenic and five- and six-ring PAHs showed no significant change in concentration. Land treatment resulted in significant toxicity reduction based on root elongation, Allium chromosomal aberration, and solid-phase Microtox bioassays. Acute toxicity, as measured by the earthworm survival assay, was significantly reduced and completely removed. The Ames spiral plate mutagenicity assay revealed that the untreated soil was slightly mutagenic and that treatment may have reduced mutagenicity. The variety of results generated from the chemical and toxicity assays emphasize the need for conducting a battery of such tests to fully understand soil remediation processes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20006160
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 23; Other Information: PBD: 1 Dec 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; SOILS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; REMEDIAL ACTION; BIOASSAY; PERFORMANCE; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; BIODEGRADATION

Citation Formats

Sayles, G.D., Acheson, C.M., Kupferle, M.J., Shan, Y., Zhou, Q., Meier, J.R., Chang, L., and Brenner, R.C. Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1021/es9810181.
Sayles, G.D., Acheson, C.M., Kupferle, M.J., Shan, Y., Zhou, Q., Meier, J.R., Chang, L., & Brenner, R.C. Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays. United States. doi:10.1021/es9810181.
Sayles, G.D., Acheson, C.M., Kupferle, M.J., Shan, Y., Zhou, Q., Meier, J.R., Chang, L., and Brenner, R.C. 1999. "Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays". United States. doi:10.1021/es9810181.
@article{osti_20006160,
title = {Land treatment of PAH-contaminated soil: Performance measured by chemical and toxicity assays},
author = {Sayles, G.D. and Acheson, C.M. and Kupferle, M.J. and Shan, Y. and Zhou, Q. and Meier, J.R. and Chang, L. and Brenner, R.C.},
abstractNote = {The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former wood-treating site was simulated at pilot scale in temperature-controlled sol pans. Nineteen two- through six-ring PAHs were monitored with time (initial total PAHs = 2,800 mg/kg). Twenty-five weeks of treatment yielded a final total PAH level of 1,160 mg/kg. Statistically significant decreases in concentrations were seen in total, two-, three-, and four-ring PAHs. Carcinogenic and five- and six-ring PAHs showed no significant change in concentration. Land treatment resulted in significant toxicity reduction based on root elongation, Allium chromosomal aberration, and solid-phase Microtox bioassays. Acute toxicity, as measured by the earthworm survival assay, was significantly reduced and completely removed. The Ames spiral plate mutagenicity assay revealed that the untreated soil was slightly mutagenic and that treatment may have reduced mutagenicity. The variety of results generated from the chemical and toxicity assays emphasize the need for conducting a battery of such tests to fully understand soil remediation processes.},
doi = {10.1021/es9810181},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 23,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = 1999,
month =
}
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