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Title: Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility

Abstract

Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.

Authors:
 [1];
  1. IT Corp., Monroeville, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
182922
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Environmental Health; Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 6; Other Information: PBD: Jan-Feb 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; NITROGEN OXIDES; HEALTH HAZARDS; CARBON MONOXIDE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; FORMALDEHYDE; ISOCYANATES

Citation Formats

Zummo, S.M., and Karol, M.H. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Zummo, S.M., & Karol, M.H. Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility. United States.
Zummo, S.M., and Karol, M.H. Mon . "Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_182922,
title = {Indoor air pollution: Acute adverse health effects and host susceptibility},
author = {Zummo, S.M. and Karol, M.H.},
abstractNote = {Increased awareness of the poor quality of indoor air compared with outdoor air has resulted in a significant amount of research on the adverse health effects and mechanisms of action of indoor air pollutants. Common indoor air agents are identified, along with resultant adverse health effects, mechanisms of action, and likely susceptible populations. Indoor air pollutants range from biological agents (such as dust mites) to chemical irritants (such as nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, and isocyanates). These agents may exert their effects through allergic as well as nonallergic mechanisms. While the public does not generally perceive poor indoor air quality as a significant health risk, increasing reports of illness related to indoor air and an expanding base of knowledge on the health effects of indoor air pollution are likely to continue pushing the issue to the forefront.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Health},
number = 6,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}
  • No abstract available.
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