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Title: Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

Abstract

Because of its potential utilization in energy exploration and defense applications, the phenomenon of brittle fracture in solids under dynamic loads has been an ongoing topic of interest. A continuum damage model was developed to simulate rock fragmentation induced by explosive blasts for in situ oil shale retorting. The model was based on the premise that the inelastic brittle response exhibited by rock under dynamic loads is due principally to the stress-induced sub-scale cracks. Locally, the growth and interaction of these sub-scale cracks relieve portions of the material volume and reduce its capability to carry load. Globally, this effect is reflected in the degradation of the material stiffness. In this manner, the dynamic fracture process was modeled as a continuous accrual of damage, where damage is considered to be the degree of reduction of the material stiffness. Reasonable correlations between calculated and measured data were obtained by this model. Although the model has achieved some degree of success, some deficiencies have been identified over the years. For example, the adequacy of representing the compressive response by perfect plasticity was questioned. Because of the damage formulation, strain-softening and localization are natural by-products of the model. Thus, a question on mesh-size dependencymore » has also been raised. This investigation is concerned with the improvement of the damage model in by including the Drucker-Prager model to represent compressional response and nonlocal treatment to tensile damage. The inclusion of the Drucker-Prager model allows pressure-dependent yield strength representation. Although the rate-dependent nature of the model may alleviate the mesh-size dependence problem, a nonlocal formulation was also investigated to insure mesh-size independency. This treatment is based on the nonlocal representation with local strain.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratory
OSTI Identifier:
175434
Report Number(s):
CONF-950686-
TRN: 95:006111-0424
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Joint applied mechanics and materials summer meeting, Los Angeles, CA (United States), 28-30 Jun 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of AMD - MD `95: Summer conference; PB: 520 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; OIL SHALES; EXPLOSIVE FRACTURING; CORRELATIONS; DYNAMIC LOADS; PLASTICITY; RETORTING; STRAIN SOFTENING; YIELD STRENGTH; FRACTURE MECHANICS

Citation Formats

Chen, E P. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Chen, E P. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model. United States.
Chen, E P. Sun . "Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model". United States.
@article{osti_175434,
title = {Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model},
author = {Chen, E P},
abstractNote = {Because of its potential utilization in energy exploration and defense applications, the phenomenon of brittle fracture in solids under dynamic loads has been an ongoing topic of interest. A continuum damage model was developed to simulate rock fragmentation induced by explosive blasts for in situ oil shale retorting. The model was based on the premise that the inelastic brittle response exhibited by rock under dynamic loads is due principally to the stress-induced sub-scale cracks. Locally, the growth and interaction of these sub-scale cracks relieve portions of the material volume and reduce its capability to carry load. Globally, this effect is reflected in the degradation of the material stiffness. In this manner, the dynamic fracture process was modeled as a continuous accrual of damage, where damage is considered to be the degree of reduction of the material stiffness. Reasonable correlations between calculated and measured data were obtained by this model. Although the model has achieved some degree of success, some deficiencies have been identified over the years. For example, the adequacy of representing the compressive response by perfect plasticity was questioned. Because of the damage formulation, strain-softening and localization are natural by-products of the model. Thus, a question on mesh-size dependency has also been raised. This investigation is concerned with the improvement of the damage model in by including the Drucker-Prager model to represent compressional response and nonlocal treatment to tensile damage. The inclusion of the Drucker-Prager model allows pressure-dependent yield strength representation. Although the rate-dependent nature of the model may alleviate the mesh-size dependence problem, a nonlocal formulation was also investigated to insure mesh-size independency. This treatment is based on the nonlocal representation with local strain.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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