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Title: Understanding the Charging Flexibility of Shared Automated Electric Vehicle Fleets

Abstract

The combined anticipated trends of vehicle sharing (ride-hailing), automated control, and powertrain electrification are poised to disrupt the current paradigm of predominately owner-driven gasoline vehicles with low levels of utilization. Shared, automated, electric vehicle (SAEV) fleets offer the potential for lower cost and emissions and have garnered significant interest among the research community. While promising, unmanaged operation of these fleets may lead to unintended negative consequences. One potentially unintended consequence is a high quantity of SAEVs charging during peak demand hours on the electric grid, potentially increasing the required generation capacity. This research explores the flexibility associated with charging loads demanded by SAEV fleets in response to servicing personal mobility travel demands. Travel demand is synthesized in four major United States metropolitan areas: Detroit, MI; Austin, TX; Washington, DC; and Miami, FL. In each of these four cities, SAEV simulations are performed using local projected electricity prices from the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) for a handful of supply side scenarios. A coordinated charging model is introduced that seeks to reduce fleet charging costs in response to time-varying electricity prices and increasing shares of personal trip demand served (between 1% and 25% of all metro trips served by the SAEVmore » fleet). Simulation results are presented across various scenarios assuming fleetwide coordination to minimize charging energy costs while constrained by offering adequate mobility service to fleet customers. The results indicate that the SAEV charging load is highly flexible; energy costs were shown to reduce between 13% and 46% across a wide range of simulated scenarios. In addition, these savings were realized without detrimentally impacting the fleet’s ability to service trips.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Ford Motor Company
OSTI Identifier:
1669414
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5400-75792
MainId:6902;UUID:cc2ba889-6132-ea11-9c2f-ac162d87dfe5;MainAdminID:13528
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the WCX 2020 World Congress Experience, 21-23 April 2020, Detroit, Michigan
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; autonomous vehicle; electric vehicle; shared vehicle; fleet; charging; grid; capacity; load flexibility

Citation Formats

Moniot, Matthew, Ge, Yanbo, Reinicke, Nicholas, and Schroeder, Alexander. Understanding the Charging Flexibility of Shared Automated Electric Vehicle Fleets. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.4271/2020-01-0941.
Moniot, Matthew, Ge, Yanbo, Reinicke, Nicholas, & Schroeder, Alexander. Understanding the Charging Flexibility of Shared Automated Electric Vehicle Fleets. United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2020-01-0941
Moniot, Matthew, Ge, Yanbo, Reinicke, Nicholas, and Schroeder, Alexander. Tue . "Understanding the Charging Flexibility of Shared Automated Electric Vehicle Fleets". United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2020-01-0941.
@article{osti_1669414,
title = {Understanding the Charging Flexibility of Shared Automated Electric Vehicle Fleets},
author = {Moniot, Matthew and Ge, Yanbo and Reinicke, Nicholas and Schroeder, Alexander},
abstractNote = {The combined anticipated trends of vehicle sharing (ride-hailing), automated control, and powertrain electrification are poised to disrupt the current paradigm of predominately owner-driven gasoline vehicles with low levels of utilization. Shared, automated, electric vehicle (SAEV) fleets offer the potential for lower cost and emissions and have garnered significant interest among the research community. While promising, unmanaged operation of these fleets may lead to unintended negative consequences. One potentially unintended consequence is a high quantity of SAEVs charging during peak demand hours on the electric grid, potentially increasing the required generation capacity. This research explores the flexibility associated with charging loads demanded by SAEV fleets in response to servicing personal mobility travel demands. Travel demand is synthesized in four major United States metropolitan areas: Detroit, MI; Austin, TX; Washington, DC; and Miami, FL. In each of these four cities, SAEV simulations are performed using local projected electricity prices from the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) for a handful of supply side scenarios. A coordinated charging model is introduced that seeks to reduce fleet charging costs in response to time-varying electricity prices and increasing shares of personal trip demand served (between 1% and 25% of all metro trips served by the SAEV fleet). Simulation results are presented across various scenarios assuming fleetwide coordination to minimize charging energy costs while constrained by offering adequate mobility service to fleet customers. The results indicate that the SAEV charging load is highly flexible; energy costs were shown to reduce between 13% and 46% across a wide range of simulated scenarios. In addition, these savings were realized without detrimentally impacting the fleet’s ability to service trips.},
doi = {10.4271/2020-01-0941},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1669414}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {4}
}

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