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Title: Quantum Computing for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, A White Paper prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics

Abstract

Tremendous excitement exists among quantum computing enthusiasts as we witness the rapid evolution of quantum computing devices toward early practical implementation. Importantly, algorithm developments suggest that qubit devices have the potential to solve quantum many-body and quantum field theory problems of relevance to various research directions within the Department of Energy Office of Science and National Science Foundation. While exascale platforms represent the current horizon of excellence in computing, quantum computing provides the technology that lies beyond this horizon and opens the door to new vistas of theoretical endeavor. During a recent workshop at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, a group of 39 scientists from academia, government, national laboratories, and industry gathered to discuss the future of quantum computing for nuclear physics. Researchers described the basic scientific challenges in quantum chromodynamics and quantum many-body problems that could be addressed utilizing the power of quantum computing in the future. The group also discussed mechanisms for developing quantum-computing algorithms specifically for nuclear physics applications. This White Paper provides a synopsis of the workshop discussions, and suggests possible activities that might be supported as part of a vibrant pilot program of nuclear physics research in this area.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [4];  [7]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  4. Inst. for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, WA (United States)
  5. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  6. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  7. Microsoft, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP)
OSTI Identifier:
1631143
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Carlson, Joseph, Dean, David J., Hjorth-Jensen, Morten, Kaplan, David, Preskill, John, Roche, Kenneth, Savage, Martin J., and Troyer, Matthias. Quantum Computing for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, A White Paper prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1631143.
Carlson, Joseph, Dean, David J., Hjorth-Jensen, Morten, Kaplan, David, Preskill, John, Roche, Kenneth, Savage, Martin J., & Troyer, Matthias. Quantum Computing for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, A White Paper prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1631143
Carlson, Joseph, Dean, David J., Hjorth-Jensen, Morten, Kaplan, David, Preskill, John, Roche, Kenneth, Savage, Martin J., and Troyer, Matthias. 2018. "Quantum Computing for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, A White Paper prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1631143. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1631143.
@article{osti_1631143,
title = {Quantum Computing for Theoretical Nuclear Physics, A White Paper prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics},
author = {Carlson, Joseph and Dean, David J. and Hjorth-Jensen, Morten and Kaplan, David and Preskill, John and Roche, Kenneth and Savage, Martin J. and Troyer, Matthias},
abstractNote = {Tremendous excitement exists among quantum computing enthusiasts as we witness the rapid evolution of quantum computing devices toward early practical implementation. Importantly, algorithm developments suggest that qubit devices have the potential to solve quantum many-body and quantum field theory problems of relevance to various research directions within the Department of Energy Office of Science and National Science Foundation. While exascale platforms represent the current horizon of excellence in computing, quantum computing provides the technology that lies beyond this horizon and opens the door to new vistas of theoretical endeavor. During a recent workshop at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, a group of 39 scientists from academia, government, national laboratories, and industry gathered to discuss the future of quantum computing for nuclear physics. Researchers described the basic scientific challenges in quantum chromodynamics and quantum many-body problems that could be addressed utilizing the power of quantum computing in the future. The group also discussed mechanisms for developing quantum-computing algorithms specifically for nuclear physics applications. This White Paper provides a synopsis of the workshop discussions, and suggests possible activities that might be supported as part of a vibrant pilot program of nuclear physics research in this area.},
doi = {10.2172/1631143},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1631143}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}