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Title: Implementation of a compliance audit program at natural gas compressor stations

Abstract

Radian performed comprehensive compliance audits at numerous natural gas compressor station sites located within the US. The purpose of the audits was to assess the environmental compliance status and to assess potential risk. The audit teams visited the sites, toured the facilities, interviewed employees, and prepared draft and final reports summarizing the findings of the assessments. Compliance with Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substances Control Act, emergency planning and preparedness, herbicide usage, non-hazardous waste and historical waste disposal practices, and use of the company`s internal environmental procedures manual were assessed. The results of the audits were placed in a database and sorted. Radian developed a ranking system and an evaluation was made of the severity of the findings. The database was used to determine which findings needed to be addressed first. In addition, the responsible party for remedying the finding was assigned, and status of each remedy was tracked to ensure closure.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Radian Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
160823
Report Number(s):
CONF-950116-
ISBN 0-7918-1292-8; TRN: IM9603%%405
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1995 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) energy sources technology conference and exhibition, Houston, TX (United States), 29 Jan - 1 Feb 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of Pipeline engineering 1995. PD-Volume 69; Williams, B.; Flanders, B.; Holter, B.; Shrake, B.; Stripling, T.; Zipp, K. [eds.]; PB: 124 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; COMPLIANCE AUDITS; GAS UTILITIES; GAS COMPRESSORS; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; MEASURING METHODS; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; DATA ANALYSIS; CLASSIFICATION; WASTE WATER; TANKS; STORAGE; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; SOLID WASTES

Citation Formats

Turner, M.M., and Miller, K.M. Implementation of a compliance audit program at natural gas compressor stations. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Turner, M.M., & Miller, K.M. Implementation of a compliance audit program at natural gas compressor stations. United States.
Turner, M.M., and Miller, K.M. 1995. "Implementation of a compliance audit program at natural gas compressor stations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_160823,
title = {Implementation of a compliance audit program at natural gas compressor stations},
author = {Turner, M.M. and Miller, K.M.},
abstractNote = {Radian performed comprehensive compliance audits at numerous natural gas compressor station sites located within the US. The purpose of the audits was to assess the environmental compliance status and to assess potential risk. The audit teams visited the sites, toured the facilities, interviewed employees, and prepared draft and final reports summarizing the findings of the assessments. Compliance with Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substances Control Act, emergency planning and preparedness, herbicide usage, non-hazardous waste and historical waste disposal practices, and use of the company`s internal environmental procedures manual were assessed. The results of the audits were placed in a database and sorted. Radian developed a ranking system and an evaluation was made of the severity of the findings. The database was used to determine which findings needed to be addressed first. In addition, the responsible party for remedying the finding was assigned, and status of each remedy was tracked to ensure closure.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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