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Title: MICROSTRUCTURE ANISOTROPY EFFECTS ON FRACTURE AND FATIGUE MECHANISMS IN SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY MARTENSITES

Abstract

The chief scientific object was to investigate the fatigue and fracture mechanisms in NiTi shape memory alloys, in the presence of stress concentrating factors such as micro-pores and notches. In particular, the interactions between structure (factors related to the geometry of the specimen, such as holes, pores and notches) and microstructure (related to properties of the material such as grains, secondary phases, twins) in influencing the inelastic deformation, leading up to fracture in NiTi was examined. Primarily, there were two major thrusts. The first thrust focused on fracture behavior in Shape Memory Alloys where the high crystal symmetry cubic phase transformed into the low symmetry phase during deformation and propagation of cracks. This thrust revealed the interplay between size of micro-pores, size of grains and grain orientations in determining the resistance to crack growth, during cyclic tensile deformation of porous-like NiTi specimens. The role of secondary phases (impurities of Ti, often formed during fabrication) were also shown to induce local inelastic deformation gradients during tensile deformation and reduce overall extent of deformation. The second thrust focused on the fatigue and fracture behavior in the low crystal symmetry martensite phase. Unlike high symmetry phases, characterization of deformation in low symmetry phasesmore » such as martensitic NiTi has been challenging, due to a hierarchical microstructure spanning from nanoscale twins to the macroscale, a highly anisotropic microstructure stemming from the low crystal symmetry and a multitude of inelastic mechanisms for deformation. Thus, advanced X-ray techniques such as 3D high-energy diffraction microscopy and x-ray micro-Laue diffraction and spectroscopy were used in conjunction with traditional techniques such as SEM and TEM to understand the inelastic deformation in the martensite phase in NiTi, in the presence of notches. This thrust revealed a stark difference in deformation mechanisms based on the nature of stress: regions near the notch experience a highly triaxial stress while those far away experience a uniaxial stress. Additionally, while regions close to the notch were shown to deform locally by amorphization/nanocrystallization, ultimately leading to fracture, regions far away from the notch deformed in a more traditional manner, with detwinning and twin reorientation the primary mechanisms of deformation. More importantly, this thrust revealed that in the presence of structural factors such as notches, the traditional picture of reorientation (coalescence) of nanoscale martensite twins into increasingly larger domains with increased loading does not hold true, even up to fracture of the specimen. These conclusions will inform the modeling and understanding of deformation behavior of specimens, where structure and microstructure coexist and interact.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Duke University
  2. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1579299
Report Number(s):
DOE-NU-0010594
8474672347
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0010594
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; shape memory alloys, size effects, martensite, structure-microstructure, notch deformation

Citation Formats

Brinson, L Catherine Catherine, and Stebner, Aaron. MICROSTRUCTURE ANISOTROPY EFFECTS ON FRACTURE AND FATIGUE MECHANISMS IN SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY MARTENSITES. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1579299.
Brinson, L Catherine Catherine, & Stebner, Aaron. MICROSTRUCTURE ANISOTROPY EFFECTS ON FRACTURE AND FATIGUE MECHANISMS IN SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY MARTENSITES. United States. doi:10.2172/1579299.
Brinson, L Catherine Catherine, and Stebner, Aaron. Fri . "MICROSTRUCTURE ANISOTROPY EFFECTS ON FRACTURE AND FATIGUE MECHANISMS IN SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY MARTENSITES". United States. doi:10.2172/1579299. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1579299.
@article{osti_1579299,
title = {MICROSTRUCTURE ANISOTROPY EFFECTS ON FRACTURE AND FATIGUE MECHANISMS IN SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY MARTENSITES},
author = {Brinson, L Catherine Catherine and Stebner, Aaron},
abstractNote = {The chief scientific object was to investigate the fatigue and fracture mechanisms in NiTi shape memory alloys, in the presence of stress concentrating factors such as micro-pores and notches. In particular, the interactions between structure (factors related to the geometry of the specimen, such as holes, pores and notches) and microstructure (related to properties of the material such as grains, secondary phases, twins) in influencing the inelastic deformation, leading up to fracture in NiTi was examined. Primarily, there were two major thrusts. The first thrust focused on fracture behavior in Shape Memory Alloys where the high crystal symmetry cubic phase transformed into the low symmetry phase during deformation and propagation of cracks. This thrust revealed the interplay between size of micro-pores, size of grains and grain orientations in determining the resistance to crack growth, during cyclic tensile deformation of porous-like NiTi specimens. The role of secondary phases (impurities of Ti, often formed during fabrication) were also shown to induce local inelastic deformation gradients during tensile deformation and reduce overall extent of deformation. The second thrust focused on the fatigue and fracture behavior in the low crystal symmetry martensite phase. Unlike high symmetry phases, characterization of deformation in low symmetry phases such as martensitic NiTi has been challenging, due to a hierarchical microstructure spanning from nanoscale twins to the macroscale, a highly anisotropic microstructure stemming from the low crystal symmetry and a multitude of inelastic mechanisms for deformation. Thus, advanced X-ray techniques such as 3D high-energy diffraction microscopy and x-ray micro-Laue diffraction and spectroscopy were used in conjunction with traditional techniques such as SEM and TEM to understand the inelastic deformation in the martensite phase in NiTi, in the presence of notches. This thrust revealed a stark difference in deformation mechanisms based on the nature of stress: regions near the notch experience a highly triaxial stress while those far away experience a uniaxial stress. Additionally, while regions close to the notch were shown to deform locally by amorphization/nanocrystallization, ultimately leading to fracture, regions far away from the notch deformed in a more traditional manner, with detwinning and twin reorientation the primary mechanisms of deformation. More importantly, this thrust revealed that in the presence of structural factors such as notches, the traditional picture of reorientation (coalescence) of nanoscale martensite twins into increasingly larger domains with increased loading does not hold true, even up to fracture of the specimen. These conclusions will inform the modeling and understanding of deformation behavior of specimens, where structure and microstructure coexist and interact.},
doi = {10.2172/1579299},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}