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Title: Observing the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles in situ

Abstract

Colloidal processes such as nucleation, growth, ripening, and dissolution are fundamental to the synthesis and application of engineered nanoparticles, as well as numerous natural systems. In nanocolloids consisting of a dispersion of nanoparticles in solution, colloidal stability is in?uenced by factors including the particle surface facet and capping layer, and local temperature, chemistry, and acidity. In this paper, we investigate colloidal stability through the real-time manipulation of nanoparticles using in situ liquid cell Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). In a distribution of uniform iron oxide nanoparticles, we use the electron beam to precisely control the local chemistry of the solution and observe the critical role that surface chemistry plays in nanoparticle stability. By functionalizing the nanoparticle surfaces with charged amino acids and peptides, stability can be tuned to promote dissolution, growth, or agglomeration, either permanently or reversibly. STEM imaging is used to quantify kinetics of individual nanoparticles subject to local variations in chemistry. These measurements of dissolution and growth rates of iron oxide nanoparticles provide insights into nanoparticle stability relevant to synthesis and functionalization for biomedical applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
  2. UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL (J. APPOINTMENT)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1571273
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-147663
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Nanoscale
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 27
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hufschmid, Ryan D., Teeman, Eric M., Mehdi, Beata L., Krishnan, Krishnan M., and Browning, Nigel D. Observing the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles in situ. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1039/c9nr03709h.
Hufschmid, Ryan D., Teeman, Eric M., Mehdi, Beata L., Krishnan, Krishnan M., & Browning, Nigel D. Observing the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles in situ. United States. doi:10.1039/c9nr03709h.
Hufschmid, Ryan D., Teeman, Eric M., Mehdi, Beata L., Krishnan, Krishnan M., and Browning, Nigel D. Sun . "Observing the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles in situ". United States. doi:10.1039/c9nr03709h.
@article{osti_1571273,
title = {Observing the colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles in situ},
author = {Hufschmid, Ryan D. and Teeman, Eric M. and Mehdi, Beata L. and Krishnan, Krishnan M. and Browning, Nigel D.},
abstractNote = {Colloidal processes such as nucleation, growth, ripening, and dissolution are fundamental to the synthesis and application of engineered nanoparticles, as well as numerous natural systems. In nanocolloids consisting of a dispersion of nanoparticles in solution, colloidal stability is in?uenced by factors including the particle surface facet and capping layer, and local temperature, chemistry, and acidity. In this paper, we investigate colloidal stability through the real-time manipulation of nanoparticles using in situ liquid cell Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). In a distribution of uniform iron oxide nanoparticles, we use the electron beam to precisely control the local chemistry of the solution and observe the critical role that surface chemistry plays in nanoparticle stability. By functionalizing the nanoparticle surfaces with charged amino acids and peptides, stability can be tuned to promote dissolution, growth, or agglomeration, either permanently or reversibly. STEM imaging is used to quantify kinetics of individual nanoparticles subject to local variations in chemistry. These measurements of dissolution and growth rates of iron oxide nanoparticles provide insights into nanoparticle stability relevant to synthesis and functionalization for biomedical applications.},
doi = {10.1039/c9nr03709h},
journal = {Nanoscale},
number = 27,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

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