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Title: Wall Upgrades for Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: A Literature Review

Abstract

In the United States, 39% of total energy consumption comes from the building sector, 20% of which is attributed to residential buildings (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2018). New, high-performance homes incorporate a combination of tight building envelopes, mechanical ventilation and efficient components to ensure comfort, adequate airflow and moisture control. These systems work together to create energy efficient homes that employ measures to manage moisture and indoor pollutants. Older homes, built before 1992 when DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program was established represent approximately 68% of building stock in the country (Livingston, Elliott, Cole, & Bartlett, 2014; U.S. Census Bureau, 2017), and often have significant air leakage and inadequate insulation. Homes with little to no air sealing or insulation result in heating and cooling losses, which can represent a substantial portion of utility bills. Done correctly, deep energy retrofits (DERs) can significantly improve the energy performance of a home’s thermal envelope, decrease indoor pollutants and increase homeowner comfort. This literature review summarizes current practices for exterior wall retrofits for existing homes, provides an overview of techno-economic approaches to investigate residential wall systems, and discusses thermal and hygrothermal modeling strategies. Accompanying this literature review is a larger effort to identify state-of-the-art technologiesmore » for existing wall energy efficiency retrofit systems that can be applied over existing siding and are suitable for the cold/very cold climates.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1544550
Report Number(s):
PNNL-28690
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
residential building, enclosures, wall assemblies, Energy Plus, WUFI, THERM, laboratory tests

Citation Formats

Antonopoulos, Chrissi A., Metzger, Cheryn E., Zhang, Jian, Ganguli, Sumitrra, Baechler, Michael C., Nagda, Harshil, and Desjarlais, Andre. Wall Upgrades for Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: A Literature Review. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1544550.
Antonopoulos, Chrissi A., Metzger, Cheryn E., Zhang, Jian, Ganguli, Sumitrra, Baechler, Michael C., Nagda, Harshil, & Desjarlais, Andre. Wall Upgrades for Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: A Literature Review. United States. doi:10.2172/1544550.
Antonopoulos, Chrissi A., Metzger, Cheryn E., Zhang, Jian, Ganguli, Sumitrra, Baechler, Michael C., Nagda, Harshil, and Desjarlais, Andre. Mon . "Wall Upgrades for Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: A Literature Review". United States. doi:10.2172/1544550. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1544550.
@article{osti_1544550,
title = {Wall Upgrades for Residential Deep Energy Retrofits: A Literature Review},
author = {Antonopoulos, Chrissi A. and Metzger, Cheryn E. and Zhang, Jian and Ganguli, Sumitrra and Baechler, Michael C. and Nagda, Harshil and Desjarlais, Andre},
abstractNote = {In the United States, 39% of total energy consumption comes from the building sector, 20% of which is attributed to residential buildings (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2018). New, high-performance homes incorporate a combination of tight building envelopes, mechanical ventilation and efficient components to ensure comfort, adequate airflow and moisture control. These systems work together to create energy efficient homes that employ measures to manage moisture and indoor pollutants. Older homes, built before 1992 when DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program was established represent approximately 68% of building stock in the country (Livingston, Elliott, Cole, & Bartlett, 2014; U.S. Census Bureau, 2017), and often have significant air leakage and inadequate insulation. Homes with little to no air sealing or insulation result in heating and cooling losses, which can represent a substantial portion of utility bills. Done correctly, deep energy retrofits (DERs) can significantly improve the energy performance of a home’s thermal envelope, decrease indoor pollutants and increase homeowner comfort. This literature review summarizes current practices for exterior wall retrofits for existing homes, provides an overview of techno-economic approaches to investigate residential wall systems, and discusses thermal and hygrothermal modeling strategies. Accompanying this literature review is a larger effort to identify state-of-the-art technologies for existing wall energy efficiency retrofit systems that can be applied over existing siding and are suitable for the cold/very cold climates.},
doi = {10.2172/1544550},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}