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Title: Silicate Coating to Prevent Leaching from Radiolabeled Surrogate Far-Field Fallout in Aqueous Environments

Abstract

Recent characterization of radioactive particles indicate that a large percentage of the radioactivity observed during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown was insoluble Cs-137 bound within silica microparticles. Therefore, much of the decontamination research performed prior to the Fukushima incident that used either soluble radionuclides deposited onto wet surfaces or large (similar to 100 mu m) particles characteristic of nuclear weapons fallout do not accurately represent the characteristics of potential contamination. Thus, the common practice of extrapolating radioactive decontamination methods generically to all radioactive release events is, at best, suspect. In response, a method to produce chemically-inert, radiolabeled silica particles was developed. Binding Eu-152 within a sodium silicate coating required proper temperature control and ethanol was beneficial as a volatile dispersant to limit residues. In the end, a step-wise method, which first deposited Eu-152 or Am-241 as a nitrate salt, decomposed the salt to a sesquioxide, and finally coated the surface with sodium silicate led to dispersed particles of the desired 2 or 0.5 mu m diameters. Dynamic light scattering and scanning election microscopy confirmed the particle size was unchanged. Leaching studies into several common decontaminants were performed to ensure particle inertness. Our approach allows for substitution of other radionuclides makingmore » it a robust, simple, and novel method to produce inert particle surrogates for a release event that allows direct comparison of decontamination techniques and contaminant fate studies, greatly aiding the development of response and recovery plans. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) - Department of the Navy
OSTI Identifier:
1531153
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Chemosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 222
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
decontamination; microparticle; nuclear fallout; radiolabel; silica; surrogate

Citation Formats

Jolin, William C., Oster, Christopher, and Kaminski, Michael. Silicate Coating to Prevent Leaching from Radiolabeled Surrogate Far-Field Fallout in Aqueous Environments. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.104.
Jolin, William C., Oster, Christopher, & Kaminski, Michael. Silicate Coating to Prevent Leaching from Radiolabeled Surrogate Far-Field Fallout in Aqueous Environments. United States. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.104.
Jolin, William C., Oster, Christopher, and Kaminski, Michael. Wed . "Silicate Coating to Prevent Leaching from Radiolabeled Surrogate Far-Field Fallout in Aqueous Environments". United States. doi:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.104.
@article{osti_1531153,
title = {Silicate Coating to Prevent Leaching from Radiolabeled Surrogate Far-Field Fallout in Aqueous Environments},
author = {Jolin, William C. and Oster, Christopher and Kaminski, Michael},
abstractNote = {Recent characterization of radioactive particles indicate that a large percentage of the radioactivity observed during the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown was insoluble Cs-137 bound within silica microparticles. Therefore, much of the decontamination research performed prior to the Fukushima incident that used either soluble radionuclides deposited onto wet surfaces or large (similar to 100 mu m) particles characteristic of nuclear weapons fallout do not accurately represent the characteristics of potential contamination. Thus, the common practice of extrapolating radioactive decontamination methods generically to all radioactive release events is, at best, suspect. In response, a method to produce chemically-inert, radiolabeled silica particles was developed. Binding Eu-152 within a sodium silicate coating required proper temperature control and ethanol was beneficial as a volatile dispersant to limit residues. In the end, a step-wise method, which first deposited Eu-152 or Am-241 as a nitrate salt, decomposed the salt to a sesquioxide, and finally coated the surface with sodium silicate led to dispersed particles of the desired 2 or 0.5 mu m diameters. Dynamic light scattering and scanning election microscopy confirmed the particle size was unchanged. Leaching studies into several common decontaminants were performed to ensure particle inertness. Our approach allows for substitution of other radionuclides making it a robust, simple, and novel method to produce inert particle surrogates for a release event that allows direct comparison of decontamination techniques and contaminant fate studies, greatly aiding the development of response and recovery plans. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
doi = {10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.104},
journal = {Chemosphere},
number = ,
volume = 222,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}