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Title: Overpumping leads to California groundwater arsenic threat

Abstract

Water resources are being challenged to meet domestic, agricultural, and industrial needs. To complement finite surface water supplies that are being stressed by changes in precipitation and increased demand, groundwater is increasingly being used. Sustaining groundwater use requires considering both water quantity and quality. A unique challenge for groundwater use, as compared with surface water, is the presence of naturally occurring contaminants within aquifer sediments, which can enter the water supply. Here we find that recent groundwater pumping, observed through land subsidence, results in an increase in aquifer arsenic concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley of California. By comparison, historic groundwater pumping shows no link to current groundwater arsenic concentrations. Our results support the premise that arsenic can reside within pore water of clay strata within aquifers and is released due to overpumping. We provide a quantitative model for using subsidence as an indicator of arsenic concentrations correlated with groundwater pumping.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Earth System Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1511430
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0016544
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Smith, Ryan, Knight, Rosemary, and Fendorf, Scott. Overpumping leads to California groundwater arsenic threat. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04475-3.
Smith, Ryan, Knight, Rosemary, & Fendorf, Scott. Overpumping leads to California groundwater arsenic threat. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04475-3.
Smith, Ryan, Knight, Rosemary, and Fendorf, Scott. Tue . "Overpumping leads to California groundwater arsenic threat". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04475-3. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511430.
@article{osti_1511430,
title = {Overpumping leads to California groundwater arsenic threat},
author = {Smith, Ryan and Knight, Rosemary and Fendorf, Scott},
abstractNote = {Water resources are being challenged to meet domestic, agricultural, and industrial needs. To complement finite surface water supplies that are being stressed by changes in precipitation and increased demand, groundwater is increasingly being used. Sustaining groundwater use requires considering both water quantity and quality. A unique challenge for groundwater use, as compared with surface water, is the presence of naturally occurring contaminants within aquifer sediments, which can enter the water supply. Here we find that recent groundwater pumping, observed through land subsidence, results in an increase in aquifer arsenic concentrations in the San Joaquin Valley of California. By comparison, historic groundwater pumping shows no link to current groundwater arsenic concentrations. Our results support the premise that arsenic can reside within pore water of clay strata within aquifers and is released due to overpumping. We provide a quantitative model for using subsidence as an indicator of arsenic concentrations correlated with groundwater pumping.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-04475-3},
journal = {Nature Communications},
issn = {2041-1723},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Works referenced in this record:

Random Forests
journal, January 2001