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Title: Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants

Abstract

This paper presents summary findings from a literature search of the term ''daylighting''-using natural light in a building to offset or replace electric lighting. According to the Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs 2000 BTS Core Databook, in 1998, commercial buildings consumed 32% of the total electricity in the United States, of which more than one-third went to lighting. Using daylighting systems and turning off the lights will help reduce this energy load. Electrical lighting adds to both the electrical and cooling loads in a commercial building. Utility costs can be decreased when daylighting is properly designed to replace electrical lighting. Along with the importance of energy savings, studies have demonstrated the non-energy-related benefits of daylighting. We compiled the data from books, periodicals, Internet articles, and interviews. The books, periodicals, and Internet articles provided the background information used to identify the main subjects of the paper. The interviews provided us with details related to specific buildings and companies that have integrated daylighting into their buildings.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO. (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15000841
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-550-30769
TRN: US200401%%275
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-99-GO10337
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 2002
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; COOLING LOAD; DAYLIGHTING; ELECTRICITY; INTERNET; OCCUPANTS; BUILDINGS; ENERGY SAVINGS; BTS DATABOOK

Citation Formats

Edwards, L, and Torcellini, P. Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.2172/15000841.
Edwards, L, & Torcellini, P. Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants. United States. doi:10.2172/15000841.
Edwards, L, and Torcellini, P. Mon . "Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants". United States. doi:10.2172/15000841. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15000841.
@article{osti_15000841,
title = {Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants},
author = {Edwards, L and Torcellini, P},
abstractNote = {This paper presents summary findings from a literature search of the term ''daylighting''-using natural light in a building to offset or replace electric lighting. According to the Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs 2000 BTS Core Databook, in 1998, commercial buildings consumed 32% of the total electricity in the United States, of which more than one-third went to lighting. Using daylighting systems and turning off the lights will help reduce this energy load. Electrical lighting adds to both the electrical and cooling loads in a commercial building. Utility costs can be decreased when daylighting is properly designed to replace electrical lighting. Along with the importance of energy savings, studies have demonstrated the non-energy-related benefits of daylighting. We compiled the data from books, periodicals, Internet articles, and interviews. The books, periodicals, and Internet articles provided the background information used to identify the main subjects of the paper. The interviews provided us with details related to specific buildings and companies that have integrated daylighting into their buildings.},
doi = {10.2172/15000841},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {7}
}

Technical Report:

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