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Title: Bison Fuel Performance Modeling on RIA in a PWR

Abstract

This report is prepared to fulfill a Level 2 milestone for CASL on “deliver and document RIA fuel performance modeling using Bison fuel performance code.” The work performed is focused on modeling the full length commercial fuel rod response under a design basis Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA), in particular, a hypothetical Control Rod Ejection Accident (CREA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Fuel rods with different burnups, 0 (fresh fuel), 20, 40, and 60 GWd/tU have been modeled with a reactivity worth insertion of $1.24 at Hot Zero Power (HZP) condition. Bison failure modeling method, and a brief summary of validations on selected RIA cases from CABRI and NSRR testing facilities are also described. The work performed has demonstrated the successful application of Bison code in the modeling of thermal and mechanical responses in RIAs for PWRs. In particular, Bison code has a more mature capability in the modeling of the frictional contact between pellet and cladding of the high burnup fuels, which is critical for modeling the Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). The modeling of RIA using Bison code shows fuels in PWR environment could have different responses than in the simulated RIA tests, and results indicate that amore » transition from PCMI to Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) could happen at relatively lower enthalpies: a better heat transfer from the fuel to coolant could increase cladding temperature and ductility, but at the same time also reduces the margin to DNB, which could cause high temperature oxidation and ballooning type of failures. The precise determination of the transition into DNB may rely on a more accurate input of the power histories in the simulated RIAs from VERA, the core simulator of CASL. The limiting conditions in PWRs could be quite different than those tests with non-typical testing conditions, and the improvement of the modeling of thermal responses, such as, clad coolant heat transfer, gap heat transfer, clad thermal inertia, and radial power profiles could be important considerations of the RIAs. In modeling the fuel responses in a fast transient, a number of variables could affect the initial burnup states, and some material models, e.g., fuel mechanical models, fission gas release, and corrosion models, and parameters can affect modeling results as well. Those uncertainties and advanced modeling capabilities need to be investigated in the future study of RIAs.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.
  2. Idaho National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), Office of Nuclear Safety (AU-30)
OSTI Identifier:
1498758
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-18-51053-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 - NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; Bison; RIA; Reactivity-Initiated Accident

Citation Formats

Liu, Wenfeng, Mai, Anh, Alvis, John, Rashid, Joe, and Folsom, Charles P. Bison Fuel Performance Modeling on RIA in a PWR. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Liu, Wenfeng, Mai, Anh, Alvis, John, Rashid, Joe, & Folsom, Charles P. Bison Fuel Performance Modeling on RIA in a PWR. United States.
Liu, Wenfeng, Mai, Anh, Alvis, John, Rashid, Joe, and Folsom, Charles P. Mon . "Bison Fuel Performance Modeling on RIA in a PWR". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1498758.
@article{osti_1498758,
title = {Bison Fuel Performance Modeling on RIA in a PWR},
author = {Liu, Wenfeng and Mai, Anh and Alvis, John and Rashid, Joe and Folsom, Charles P},
abstractNote = {This report is prepared to fulfill a Level 2 milestone for CASL on “deliver and document RIA fuel performance modeling using Bison fuel performance code.” The work performed is focused on modeling the full length commercial fuel rod response under a design basis Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA), in particular, a hypothetical Control Rod Ejection Accident (CREA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Fuel rods with different burnups, 0 (fresh fuel), 20, 40, and 60 GWd/tU have been modeled with a reactivity worth insertion of $1.24 at Hot Zero Power (HZP) condition. Bison failure modeling method, and a brief summary of validations on selected RIA cases from CABRI and NSRR testing facilities are also described. The work performed has demonstrated the successful application of Bison code in the modeling of thermal and mechanical responses in RIAs for PWRs. In particular, Bison code has a more mature capability in the modeling of the frictional contact between pellet and cladding of the high burnup fuels, which is critical for modeling the Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). The modeling of RIA using Bison code shows fuels in PWR environment could have different responses than in the simulated RIA tests, and results indicate that a transition from PCMI to Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) could happen at relatively lower enthalpies: a better heat transfer from the fuel to coolant could increase cladding temperature and ductility, but at the same time also reduces the margin to DNB, which could cause high temperature oxidation and ballooning type of failures. The precise determination of the transition into DNB may rely on a more accurate input of the power histories in the simulated RIAs from VERA, the core simulator of CASL. The limiting conditions in PWRs could be quite different than those tests with non-typical testing conditions, and the improvement of the modeling of thermal responses, such as, clad coolant heat transfer, gap heat transfer, clad thermal inertia, and radial power profiles could be important considerations of the RIAs. In modeling the fuel responses in a fast transient, a number of variables could affect the initial burnup states, and some material models, e.g., fuel mechanical models, fission gas release, and corrosion models, and parameters can affect modeling results as well. Those uncertainties and advanced modeling capabilities need to be investigated in the future study of RIAs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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