skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Feasibility of Development of Geothermal Deep Direct-Use District Heating and Cooling system at West Virginia University Campus-Morgantown, WV

Abstract

The Morgantown campus of West Virginia University (WVU) is uniquely positioned to host the first geothermal deep direct-use district heating and cooling (GDHC) system in the eastern United States. While much of the eastern United States does not have elevated heat flow, the Morgantown region of West Virginia is unique in exhibiting sufficient temperatures at the depth of a formation, the Tuscarora, which is expected to support a desirable flow rate of geofluid. Temperature and flow rate were identified in the 2006 MIT Future of Geothermal Energy Report to be the two most critical factors in minimizing the cost of geothermal energy. The WVU campus site offers surface demand coupled with the potential subsurface viability. Specifically, the existing district heating and cooling system that is in use year round will be leveraged. Absorption chilling systems are used to cool the campus in the summer and provide hot water circulating heat in the winter. Our overall project objectives are to 1) collect local information on these critical factors to understand the uncertainty and reduce the risk associated with developing the geothermal resource for use in a WVU campus GDHC system, and 2) complete an optimized design for the GDHC system bymore » minimizing the delivered Levelized Cost of Heat (LCOH). A Tuscarora geological model was built based on core analysis and permeability measurements using data from nearby wells. This geological model is then translated into a reservoir model. iTOUGH2/EOS1 is used to simulate the subsurface portion of a GDHC system using two well configurations: 1) a pair of vertical wells, and 2) a pair of horizontal wells. The performance of both configurations is evaluated based on achievable flow rates and production fluid temperatures; the recommended well configuration is selected based on the expected GDHC system performance. The thermal breakthrough and reservoir productivity increased for horizontal well configuration however, the well-head LCOH for vertical well horizontal well configuration is higher than vertical wells due to the additional cost of horizontal drilling. To minimize the delivered LCOH, we perform an integrated surface-to-subsurface optimization of the full GDHC system. The economic and performance analysis of the GDHC system is evaluated for two cases: 1) using existing district heating and cooling facilities, and 2) by converting the current WVU campus steam infrastructure to a hot water system. The optimized GDHC system will be selected by minimizing the LCOH over these two possible configurations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2]
  1. Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
  3. Cornell University School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ithaca, NY
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
West Virginia University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Renewable Power Office. Geothermal Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1493896
Report Number(s):
DOE-WVU-SGW
3042935028
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0008105
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 44th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, Stanford, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; Deep direct-use, GDHC, hybrid geothermal system, numerical modeling

Citation Formats

Garapati, Nagasree, Alonge, Oluwasogo B, Hall, Landon, Irr, Victoria J, Zhang, Yingqi, Smith, Jared D, Jeanne, Pierre, and Doughty, Christine. Feasibility of Development of Geothermal Deep Direct-Use District Heating and Cooling system at West Virginia University Campus-Morgantown, WV. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Garapati, Nagasree, Alonge, Oluwasogo B, Hall, Landon, Irr, Victoria J, Zhang, Yingqi, Smith, Jared D, Jeanne, Pierre, & Doughty, Christine. Feasibility of Development of Geothermal Deep Direct-Use District Heating and Cooling system at West Virginia University Campus-Morgantown, WV. United States.
Garapati, Nagasree, Alonge, Oluwasogo B, Hall, Landon, Irr, Victoria J, Zhang, Yingqi, Smith, Jared D, Jeanne, Pierre, and Doughty, Christine. Mon . "Feasibility of Development of Geothermal Deep Direct-Use District Heating and Cooling system at West Virginia University Campus-Morgantown, WV". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1493896.
@article{osti_1493896,
title = {Feasibility of Development of Geothermal Deep Direct-Use District Heating and Cooling system at West Virginia University Campus-Morgantown, WV},
author = {Garapati, Nagasree and Alonge, Oluwasogo B and Hall, Landon and Irr, Victoria J and Zhang, Yingqi and Smith, Jared D and Jeanne, Pierre and Doughty, Christine},
abstractNote = {The Morgantown campus of West Virginia University (WVU) is uniquely positioned to host the first geothermal deep direct-use district heating and cooling (GDHC) system in the eastern United States. While much of the eastern United States does not have elevated heat flow, the Morgantown region of West Virginia is unique in exhibiting sufficient temperatures at the depth of a formation, the Tuscarora, which is expected to support a desirable flow rate of geofluid. Temperature and flow rate were identified in the 2006 MIT Future of Geothermal Energy Report to be the two most critical factors in minimizing the cost of geothermal energy. The WVU campus site offers surface demand coupled with the potential subsurface viability. Specifically, the existing district heating and cooling system that is in use year round will be leveraged. Absorption chilling systems are used to cool the campus in the summer and provide hot water circulating heat in the winter. Our overall project objectives are to 1) collect local information on these critical factors to understand the uncertainty and reduce the risk associated with developing the geothermal resource for use in a WVU campus GDHC system, and 2) complete an optimized design for the GDHC system by minimizing the delivered Levelized Cost of Heat (LCOH). A Tuscarora geological model was built based on core analysis and permeability measurements using data from nearby wells. This geological model is then translated into a reservoir model. iTOUGH2/EOS1 is used to simulate the subsurface portion of a GDHC system using two well configurations: 1) a pair of vertical wells, and 2) a pair of horizontal wells. The performance of both configurations is evaluated based on achievable flow rates and production fluid temperatures; the recommended well configuration is selected based on the expected GDHC system performance. The thermal breakthrough and reservoir productivity increased for horizontal well configuration however, the well-head LCOH for vertical well horizontal well configuration is higher than vertical wells due to the additional cost of horizontal drilling. To minimize the delivered LCOH, we perform an integrated surface-to-subsurface optimization of the full GDHC system. The economic and performance analysis of the GDHC system is evaluated for two cases: 1) using existing district heating and cooling facilities, and 2) by converting the current WVU campus steam infrastructure to a hot water system. The optimized GDHC system will be selected by minimizing the LCOH over these two possible configurations.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1493896}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: