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Title: Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations.

Abstract

This is the initial milestone report of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Suitability study by Sandia National Laboratories and the Scitor Team (Scitor Corporation and Landrey & Company). This study reflects the intent of the memorandum of understanding between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) to enhance national energy security and demonstrate leadership in transitioning to a low carbon economy. This report summarizes existing guidance and studies relating to SMRs and includes an update on light water reactor SMR technology. A key product of this phase of the study is identification of Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado and Clear Air Force Station, Alaska for detailed use case SMR suitability analyses. The final report in December 2015 will assess the feasibility of SMRs for energy security and clean energy for Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) installations. This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY During this first phase of the study, the team conducted broad research of existing federal and private sector policy, guidance, regulations, studies, and reports. Through this and other research the team identified major processes, potential impediments and issues, and key considerations that would affect SMR deployment on AFSPC installations. This research provided valuablemore » information for development of use case installation selection criteria. Further, it will aid the development of recommendations for essential changes needed to facilitate successful and effective SMR deployment. With the assistance of members of the Headquarters, AFSPC staff and other DoD and Air Force representatives, the team also worked with major stakeholders to garner their inputs on factors affecting SMR deployment. The team also gathered information from the four US companies that are developing near term light-water SMRs on the operational performance characteristics and commercialization status of their technologies. Further, the team gathered perspectives of SMR deployment scenarios from utilities that are operating nuclear power plants and some that are serving AFSPC installations. This effort also included an assessment of the Lifecycle Cost of Energy for SMRs and preliminary consideration of economic factors that are critical to realistic commercial introduction of SMRs. The team began with the 12 AFSPC installations in the Continental United States and Alaska and applied criteria derived from research and stakeholder interactions to determine the two optimum installations for the use case studies. The AFSPC installations vary from large Air Force Bases (AFB), with multiple missions, fully mature infrastructures, and robust services to small Air Force Stations (AFS) with single missions and limited infrastructures, often in remote locations. The selection criteria evolved into two categories: AFSPC-related criteria (mission priorities, synergistic support capabilities, and installation operations) and siting criteria (available land, seismology, hydrology, population density, proximity to hazardous activities/protected lands). For mission priorities, the team used prioritized space superiority activities approved by the Commander, AFSPC, and inputs from various subject matter experts (SME). The team determined synergistic support capabilities--installation-SMR owner/operator collaboration on key activities such as security, fire protection, and emergency response--from existing host unit documents, SME inputs, and team member familiarity with AFSPC installation capabilities. Installation operations factors were obtained through inputs from applicable Air Force agencies and SMEs. Based on Department of Energy guidance, the team developed values for a Site Selection Evaluation Criteria and submitted them to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to apply their Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion tool. Since data for Clear AFS, AK are not currently included in the siting tool, the team used similar United States Geologic Survey data. Finally, since the study's focus is SMR feasibility versus actual siting, the team considered use case-unique considerations rather than using AFSPC and siting criteria as the only determinants in selecting the use case installations. As a result of the selection process, the team concluded that Schriever AFB, CO and Clear AFS, AK best lend themselves to the more detailed use case feasibility analysis. This conclusion considers the higher priority missions performed on both installations and their generally favorable siting characteristics, but also enables a robust use case comparison of two installations that represent the spectrum of AFSPC installation characteristics: a fully-mature, multi-mission AFB and a more limited capability, single mission, remotely-located AFS. The next phase of the SMR Suitability study will involve performing use case studies of Schriever AFB and Clear AFS. This includes site visits; in-depth interaction with installation SMEs; expanding interaction with DoD, Air Force, AFSPC, and private sector entities; refining commercial business models; and consideration of micro-grids and other technologies that may enhance SMR deployment on DoD installations« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1490530
Report Number(s):
SAND2015-8732
671255
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Middleton, Bobby, Boland, Thomas R., Schlafli, William E., and Landrey, Bruce. Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations.. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1490530.
Middleton, Bobby, Boland, Thomas R., Schlafli, William E., & Landrey, Bruce. Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations.. United States. doi:10.2172/1490530.
Middleton, Bobby, Boland, Thomas R., Schlafli, William E., and Landrey, Bruce. Thu . "Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations.". United States. doi:10.2172/1490530. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1490530.
@article{osti_1490530,
title = {Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations.},
author = {Middleton, Bobby and Boland, Thomas R. and Schlafli, William E. and Landrey, Bruce},
abstractNote = {This is the initial milestone report of the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Suitability study by Sandia National Laboratories and the Scitor Team (Scitor Corporation and Landrey & Company). This study reflects the intent of the memorandum of understanding between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense (DOD) to enhance national energy security and demonstrate leadership in transitioning to a low carbon economy. This report summarizes existing guidance and studies relating to SMRs and includes an update on light water reactor SMR technology. A key product of this phase of the study is identification of Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado and Clear Air Force Station, Alaska for detailed use case SMR suitability analyses. The final report in December 2015 will assess the feasibility of SMRs for energy security and clean energy for Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) installations. This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY During this first phase of the study, the team conducted broad research of existing federal and private sector policy, guidance, regulations, studies, and reports. Through this and other research the team identified major processes, potential impediments and issues, and key considerations that would affect SMR deployment on AFSPC installations. This research provided valuable information for development of use case installation selection criteria. Further, it will aid the development of recommendations for essential changes needed to facilitate successful and effective SMR deployment. With the assistance of members of the Headquarters, AFSPC staff and other DoD and Air Force representatives, the team also worked with major stakeholders to garner their inputs on factors affecting SMR deployment. The team also gathered information from the four US companies that are developing near term light-water SMRs on the operational performance characteristics and commercialization status of their technologies. Further, the team gathered perspectives of SMR deployment scenarios from utilities that are operating nuclear power plants and some that are serving AFSPC installations. This effort also included an assessment of the Lifecycle Cost of Energy for SMRs and preliminary consideration of economic factors that are critical to realistic commercial introduction of SMRs. The team began with the 12 AFSPC installations in the Continental United States and Alaska and applied criteria derived from research and stakeholder interactions to determine the two optimum installations for the use case studies. The AFSPC installations vary from large Air Force Bases (AFB), with multiple missions, fully mature infrastructures, and robust services to small Air Force Stations (AFS) with single missions and limited infrastructures, often in remote locations. The selection criteria evolved into two categories: AFSPC-related criteria (mission priorities, synergistic support capabilities, and installation operations) and siting criteria (available land, seismology, hydrology, population density, proximity to hazardous activities/protected lands). For mission priorities, the team used prioritized space superiority activities approved by the Commander, AFSPC, and inputs from various subject matter experts (SME). The team determined synergistic support capabilities--installation-SMR owner/operator collaboration on key activities such as security, fire protection, and emergency response--from existing host unit documents, SME inputs, and team member familiarity with AFSPC installation capabilities. Installation operations factors were obtained through inputs from applicable Air Force agencies and SMEs. Based on Department of Energy guidance, the team developed values for a Site Selection Evaluation Criteria and submitted them to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to apply their Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion tool. Since data for Clear AFS, AK are not currently included in the siting tool, the team used similar United States Geologic Survey data. Finally, since the study's focus is SMR feasibility versus actual siting, the team considered use case-unique considerations rather than using AFSPC and siting criteria as the only determinants in selecting the use case installations. As a result of the selection process, the team concluded that Schriever AFB, CO and Clear AFS, AK best lend themselves to the more detailed use case feasibility analysis. This conclusion considers the higher priority missions performed on both installations and their generally favorable siting characteristics, but also enables a robust use case comparison of two installations that represent the spectrum of AFSPC installation characteristics: a fully-mature, multi-mission AFB and a more limited capability, single mission, remotely-located AFS. The next phase of the SMR Suitability study will involve performing use case studies of Schriever AFB and Clear AFS. This includes site visits; in-depth interaction with installation SMEs; expanding interaction with DoD, Air Force, AFSPC, and private sector entities; refining commercial business models; and consideration of micro-grids and other technologies that may enhance SMR deployment on DoD installations},
doi = {10.2172/1490530},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}