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Title: Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint for ferromagnetic components

Abstract

Here in this work, the suitability of magnetic Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint of ferromagnetic components is determined. This technique has potential for this application because it is based inherently on the near surface microstructural features of ferromagnetic materials. All materials typically display some variation in their microstructure simply as a result of the manufacturing process (rolling, heat treating, welding, grinding), thus providing the potential that Barkhausen noise measurements between nominally similar components will be unique. In this work, we demonstrate that Barkhausen noise measurements are both repeatable in time for a single sample made from a ferromagnetic material, and unique across a number of instances of nominally similar samples. The results of this work have profound implications in a variety of applications in forensics and physical security. For example, consider the fabrication of the next generation of tamper-evident containers and devices using conventional processes for steel. In addition, since Barkhausen noise is sensitive to changes in microstructures due to grinding and welding, these measurements can be used to detect clandestine repairs and tampering. Finally, because the method inherently results in a time series measurement at each point on a sample, it is expected to have far higher dimensionalitymore » than physically similar eddy current measurement. However, the higher dimensionality of Barkhausen measurements suggest that they should be harder to counterfeit than eddy current measurements.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of State; USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Office of Site Operations (LM-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1483514
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-22941
Journal ID: ISSN 0964-1726
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001; AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Smart Materials and Structures
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0964-1726
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Mascareñas, David, Lockhart, Michelle, and Lienert, Thomas. Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint for ferromagnetic components. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/aae762.
Mascareñas, David, Lockhart, Michelle, & Lienert, Thomas. Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint for ferromagnetic components. United States. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/aae762.
Mascareñas, David, Lockhart, Michelle, and Lienert, Thomas. Fri . "Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint for ferromagnetic components". United States. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/aae762. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1483514.
@article{osti_1483514,
title = {Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint for ferromagnetic components},
author = {Mascareñas, David and Lockhart, Michelle and Lienert, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Here in this work, the suitability of magnetic Barkhausen noise as an intrinsic fingerprint of ferromagnetic components is determined. This technique has potential for this application because it is based inherently on the near surface microstructural features of ferromagnetic materials. All materials typically display some variation in their microstructure simply as a result of the manufacturing process (rolling, heat treating, welding, grinding), thus providing the potential that Barkhausen noise measurements between nominally similar components will be unique. In this work, we demonstrate that Barkhausen noise measurements are both repeatable in time for a single sample made from a ferromagnetic material, and unique across a number of instances of nominally similar samples. The results of this work have profound implications in a variety of applications in forensics and physical security. For example, consider the fabrication of the next generation of tamper-evident containers and devices using conventional processes for steel. In addition, since Barkhausen noise is sensitive to changes in microstructures due to grinding and welding, these measurements can be used to detect clandestine repairs and tampering. Finally, because the method inherently results in a time series measurement at each point on a sample, it is expected to have far higher dimensionality than physically similar eddy current measurement. However, the higher dimensionality of Barkhausen measurements suggest that they should be harder to counterfeit than eddy current measurements.},
doi = {10.1088/1361-665X/aae762},
journal = {Smart Materials and Structures},
issn = {0964-1726},
number = 1,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

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