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Title: The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine (Final Report)

Abstract

The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging This project established the Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) translational program, focused on the acceleration of new clinical molecular imaging methods. Molecular imaging approaches to imaging are a very flexible and powerful development, with many recent examples advancing the diagnosis and guiding the management of human disease. These methods depend on the design, synthesis and testing of new radiotracers (molecules designed to target specific cells or tissues in the body), labeled with short-lived radioactive atoms (positron emitters). The new radiotracers are imaged in the human body using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The University of Michigan PET Center has considerable experience in the discovery, development, refinement and initial human applications of new PET radiotracers. An emerging impediment to efficient availability of new PET radiotracers, however, involves the regulatory environment at multiple levels. Many potentially successful ideas are delayed or even prevented from entering human use by these barriers. In the current grant, we provided hands-on experience for the next generation of young scientists working in molecular imaging so that they are equipped to effectively move new ideas and radiotracers from the researchmore » laboratory to the nuclear medicine clinic (bench-to-bedside). For new radiotracer development, oversight by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and local institutional committees and reviews are required. These aspects of translation from laboratory to clinic are often omitted from the formal training of new scientists, but were provided to three trainees via direct mentorship in the MNTR program. The MNTR training program built on the translational successes of the University of Michigan Division of Nuclear Medicine and capitalized on our strengths (facilities, faculty, a wide-ranging selection of projects, and the experience and commitment to bring new radiotracers into human studies) to systematically train three fellows in radiochemistry and nuclear medicine. Integrated training in development, validation and clinical translation of new PET radiotracers occurred through practical involvement in multiple research projects, each at a different stage along the pathway from bench-to-bedside. Each trainee obtained experience of the entire process over about 2 years. Projects involved development of new radiotracers for neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer disease), movement disorders (e.g. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy) and neurodevelopmental syndromes (e.g. Tourette syndrome) as well as new radiochemistry methods for synthesizing radiotracers. Each project was pursued in a close collaboration between the fellow trainee and both the clinical and basic science faculty at the University of Michigan PET Center, and provided an unprecedented opportunity for the highest-level training in academic radiochemistry and nuclear medicine research. The project has resulted in 17 peer-reviewed publications to date, and at least 4 more are in preparation. Additionally, 1 book chapter and 26 conference presentations have resulted from this grant. Upon completion of the MNTR Program, the trainees have emerged as translational scientists wielding the necessary skill-set (practical research experience, multidisciplinary training, regulatory know-how) to embark on successful careers in translational molecular imaging, bringing continued advances in the field to bear on important human disorders. As a metric of the Program’s success, one fellow has already secured employment in the field, while the other two are finishing writing papers; they wish to also stay in the radiochemistry and nuclear medicine community, and are currently applying for jobs.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1482557
Report Number(s):
DOE-UMICH-12484
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0012484
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; radiochemistry; nuclear medicine; positron emission tomography

Citation Formats

Scott, Peter J. H., and Frey, Kirk A. The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine (Final Report). United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1482557.
Scott, Peter J. H., & Frey, Kirk A. The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine (Final Report). United States. doi:10.2172/1482557.
Scott, Peter J. H., and Frey, Kirk A. Mon . "The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine (Final Report)". United States. doi:10.2172/1482557. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1482557.
@article{osti_1482557,
title = {The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine (Final Report)},
author = {Scott, Peter J. H. and Frey, Kirk A.},
abstractNote = {The Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) Translational Program in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging This project established the Michigan New Technology Training and Research (MNTR) translational program, focused on the acceleration of new clinical molecular imaging methods. Molecular imaging approaches to imaging are a very flexible and powerful development, with many recent examples advancing the diagnosis and guiding the management of human disease. These methods depend on the design, synthesis and testing of new radiotracers (molecules designed to target specific cells or tissues in the body), labeled with short-lived radioactive atoms (positron emitters). The new radiotracers are imaged in the human body using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The University of Michigan PET Center has considerable experience in the discovery, development, refinement and initial human applications of new PET radiotracers. An emerging impediment to efficient availability of new PET radiotracers, however, involves the regulatory environment at multiple levels. Many potentially successful ideas are delayed or even prevented from entering human use by these barriers. In the current grant, we provided hands-on experience for the next generation of young scientists working in molecular imaging so that they are equipped to effectively move new ideas and radiotracers from the research laboratory to the nuclear medicine clinic (bench-to-bedside). For new radiotracer development, oversight by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and local institutional committees and reviews are required. These aspects of translation from laboratory to clinic are often omitted from the formal training of new scientists, but were provided to three trainees via direct mentorship in the MNTR program. The MNTR training program built on the translational successes of the University of Michigan Division of Nuclear Medicine and capitalized on our strengths (facilities, faculty, a wide-ranging selection of projects, and the experience and commitment to bring new radiotracers into human studies) to systematically train three fellows in radiochemistry and nuclear medicine. Integrated training in development, validation and clinical translation of new PET radiotracers occurred through practical involvement in multiple research projects, each at a different stage along the pathway from bench-to-bedside. Each trainee obtained experience of the entire process over about 2 years. Projects involved development of new radiotracers for neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer disease), movement disorders (e.g. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy) and neurodevelopmental syndromes (e.g. Tourette syndrome) as well as new radiochemistry methods for synthesizing radiotracers. Each project was pursued in a close collaboration between the fellow trainee and both the clinical and basic science faculty at the University of Michigan PET Center, and provided an unprecedented opportunity for the highest-level training in academic radiochemistry and nuclear medicine research. The project has resulted in 17 peer-reviewed publications to date, and at least 4 more are in preparation. Additionally, 1 book chapter and 26 conference presentations have resulted from this grant. Upon completion of the MNTR Program, the trainees have emerged as translational scientists wielding the necessary skill-set (practical research experience, multidisciplinary training, regulatory know-how) to embark on successful careers in translational molecular imaging, bringing continued advances in the field to bear on important human disorders. As a metric of the Program’s success, one fellow has already secured employment in the field, while the other two are finishing writing papers; they wish to also stay in the radiochemistry and nuclear medicine community, and are currently applying for jobs.},
doi = {10.2172/1482557},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

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