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Title: Distribution System V1G PEV Charging Impacts Report

Abstract

Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) are a clean form of transportation that will require a new control paradigm between the energy supply and the transportation sectors as PEV adoption continues to grow. Meeting the projected PEV energy demands will require implementing PEV / grid integration methods beyond charging PEVs at incentivized times. MATLAB was used to simulate the daily vehicle trip demands and charging processes of hundreds of PEVs. The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data was used as the source of vehicle travel data, and EV Project provided measured PEV charging data to calibrate the PEV population models. GridLAB-D analyses used a prototypical feeder and PEV population models to evaluate residential PEV V1G (unidirectional) charging in multiple locations, V1G PEV distribution feeder impacts, Time-Of-Use (TOU) rate effects on PEV charging, and charging control methods. The key findings were: optimized charging using California TOU rates could result in savings of over $20 per month for non-TOU program participants; non-TOU participants consume 30-40% of PEV charging energy; about 50% of PEV drivers have their transportation fuel bill reduced by 50 dollars per month; 6.6kW charging will cause distribution transformer power limits to be exceeded on prototypical feeders if the household PEV adoptionmore » rate reaches 0.75 PEVs per home; distribution feeder loading is proportional to PEV charging rate; a method was devised to remotely identify when residential transformer overloads occur using changes in PEV charging rate; and the low-cost TOU period is composed of a distribution of PEVs needing small, medium and larger energy needs that can be more effectively shifted as groups to mitigate the TOU peak power and enable a higher PEV adoption rate per household without overloading distribution transformers.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1480851
Report Number(s):
PNNL-27206
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; charging; electric vehicles; EV; grid; PHEV

Citation Formats

Pratt, Richard M., and Bernal, Leonardo E. Distribution System V1G PEV Charging Impacts Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1480851.
Pratt, Richard M., & Bernal, Leonardo E. Distribution System V1G PEV Charging Impacts Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1480851.
Pratt, Richard M., and Bernal, Leonardo E. Mon . "Distribution System V1G PEV Charging Impacts Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1480851. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1480851.
@article{osti_1480851,
title = {Distribution System V1G PEV Charging Impacts Report},
author = {Pratt, Richard M. and Bernal, Leonardo E.},
abstractNote = {Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) are a clean form of transportation that will require a new control paradigm between the energy supply and the transportation sectors as PEV adoption continues to grow. Meeting the projected PEV energy demands will require implementing PEV / grid integration methods beyond charging PEVs at incentivized times. MATLAB was used to simulate the daily vehicle trip demands and charging processes of hundreds of PEVs. The National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) data was used as the source of vehicle travel data, and EV Project provided measured PEV charging data to calibrate the PEV population models. GridLAB-D analyses used a prototypical feeder and PEV population models to evaluate residential PEV V1G (unidirectional) charging in multiple locations, V1G PEV distribution feeder impacts, Time-Of-Use (TOU) rate effects on PEV charging, and charging control methods. The key findings were: optimized charging using California TOU rates could result in savings of over $20 per month for non-TOU program participants; non-TOU participants consume 30-40% of PEV charging energy; about 50% of PEV drivers have their transportation fuel bill reduced by 50 dollars per month; 6.6kW charging will cause distribution transformer power limits to be exceeded on prototypical feeders if the household PEV adoption rate reaches 0.75 PEVs per home; distribution feeder loading is proportional to PEV charging rate; a method was devised to remotely identify when residential transformer overloads occur using changes in PEV charging rate; and the low-cost TOU period is composed of a distribution of PEVs needing small, medium and larger energy needs that can be more effectively shifted as groups to mitigate the TOU peak power and enable a higher PEV adoption rate per household without overloading distribution transformers.},
doi = {10.2172/1480851},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}