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Title: Creeping faults: Good news, bad news?

Abstract

The motion of the Earth's tectonic plates drive fault slip. Some faults slip in sudden movements, releasing great amounts of energy during large earthquake ruptures, while others slip in steadier movements which release energy more slowly. The latter, known as creeping faults, are believed to be less hazardous but there is mounting evidence that they are more complex than previously thought and can also pose a significant hazard. A recent review by Harris [2017] documents the earthquake potential of creeping faults in shallow continental fault zones from worldwide data. Furthermore, she presents a comprehensive review of prior studies; key insights into when, where, and why fault creep takes place and under which conditions creeping faults may represent high seismic hazard and suggests some directions for future research.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. National Taiwan Normal Univ., Taipei (Taiwan)
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1479316
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Reviews of Geophysics (1985)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 8755-1209
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; creeping fault; earthquake potential; strong motion; earthquake rupture

Citation Formats

Chen, Kate Huihsuan, and Bürgmann, Roland. Creeping faults: Good news, bad news?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017RG000565.
Chen, Kate Huihsuan, & Bürgmann, Roland. Creeping faults: Good news, bad news?. United States. doi:10.1002/2017RG000565.
Chen, Kate Huihsuan, and Bürgmann, Roland. Thu . "Creeping faults: Good news, bad news?". United States. doi:10.1002/2017RG000565. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1479316.
@article{osti_1479316,
title = {Creeping faults: Good news, bad news?},
author = {Chen, Kate Huihsuan and Bürgmann, Roland},
abstractNote = {The motion of the Earth's tectonic plates drive fault slip. Some faults slip in sudden movements, releasing great amounts of energy during large earthquake ruptures, while others slip in steadier movements which release energy more slowly. The latter, known as creeping faults, are believed to be less hazardous but there is mounting evidence that they are more complex than previously thought and can also pose a significant hazard. A recent review by Harris [2017] documents the earthquake potential of creeping faults in shallow continental fault zones from worldwide data. Furthermore, she presents a comprehensive review of prior studies; key insights into when, where, and why fault creep takes place and under which conditions creeping faults may represent high seismic hazard and suggests some directions for future research.},
doi = {10.1002/2017RG000565},
journal = {Reviews of Geophysics (1985)},
issn = {8755-1209},
number = 2,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {4}
}

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