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Title: Soil erosion and conservation in the United States: An overview. Agriculture information bulletin. (Final)

Abstract

Soil erosion on agricultural land in the United States does not pose an immediate threat to the Nation`s ability to produce food and fiber. However, erosion is impairing long-term soil productivity in some areas and is the largest contributor to nonpoint source pollution of the Nation`s waterways. Conservation and commodity programs are currently being coordinated to futher conservation objectives. This report provides background information on soil use, erosion, and conservation policies and programs; summarizes assessments of economic and environmental effects of erosion; and discusses policies and programs as well as options for their improvement.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Economic Research Service, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
147522
Report Number(s):
PB-96-109434/XAB; USDA/AIB-718
TRN: 53243646
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Oct 1995
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; AGRICULTURE; SOIL CONSERVATION; RISK ASSESSMENT; USA; RESOURCE CONSERVATION

Citation Formats

Magleby, R., Sandretto, C., Crosswhite, W., and Osborn, C.T.. Soil erosion and conservation in the United States: An overview. Agriculture information bulletin. (Final). United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Magleby, R., Sandretto, C., Crosswhite, W., & Osborn, C.T.. Soil erosion and conservation in the United States: An overview. Agriculture information bulletin. (Final). United States.
Magleby, R., Sandretto, C., Crosswhite, W., and Osborn, C.T.. 1995. "Soil erosion and conservation in the United States: An overview. Agriculture information bulletin. (Final)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_147522,
title = {Soil erosion and conservation in the United States: An overview. Agriculture information bulletin. (Final)},
author = {Magleby, R. and Sandretto, C. and Crosswhite, W. and Osborn, C.T.},
abstractNote = {Soil erosion on agricultural land in the United States does not pose an immediate threat to the Nation`s ability to produce food and fiber. However, erosion is impairing long-term soil productivity in some areas and is the largest contributor to nonpoint source pollution of the Nation`s waterways. Conservation and commodity programs are currently being coordinated to futher conservation objectives. This report provides background information on soil use, erosion, and conservation policies and programs; summarizes assessments of economic and environmental effects of erosion; and discusses policies and programs as well as options for their improvement.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Technical Report:
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