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Title: Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

Abstract

Abstract In this study, a series of reduction experiments were conducted using a representative uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U60 (K 16Li 44[UO 2(O 2)OH] 60) and a bacterial species,Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that is capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction. U60 was reduced byS. oneidensisin the absence of O 2, but the reduction kinetics for U60 were significantly slower than was observed in this study for aqueous uranyl acetate, and were faster than was reported in previous studies for solid phase U(VI). Our results indicate that U60 aggregates bigger than 0.2 μm formed immediately upon mixing with the bacterial growth medium, and that these aggregates were gradually broken down during the process of reduction. Neither reduction nor dissolution of U60 was observed during 72 h of control experiments open to the atmosphere, indicating that the breakdown and dissolution of U60 aggregates is caused by the reduction of U60, and thatS. oneidensisis capable of direct reduction of the U(VI) within the U60 nanoclusters, likely due to the adsorption of U60 aggregates onto bacterial cells. This study is first to show the reduction capacity of bacteria for uranyl peroxide nanoclusters, and the results yield a better understanding of the long term fate of uranium inmore » environmental systems in which uranyl peroxide nanoclusters are present.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Materials Science of Actinides (MSA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1470033
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001089
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiochimica Acta; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: MSA partners with University of Notre Dame (lead); University of California, Davis; Florida State University; George Washington University; University of Michigan; University of Minnesota; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Oregon state University; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Savannah River National Laboratory
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
nuclear (including radiation effects), materials and chemistry by design, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly)

Citation Formats

Yu, Qiang, and Fein, Jeremy B. Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1515/ract-2017-2759.
Yu, Qiang, & Fein, Jeremy B. Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. United States. doi:10.1515/ract-2017-2759.
Yu, Qiang, and Fein, Jeremy B. Fri . "Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1". United States. doi:10.1515/ract-2017-2759.
@article{osti_1470033,
title = {Enzymatic reduction of U60 nanoclusters by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1},
author = {Yu, Qiang and Fein, Jeremy B.},
abstractNote = {Abstract In this study, a series of reduction experiments were conducted using a representative uranyl peroxide nanocluster, U60 (K16Li44[UO2(O2)OH]60) and a bacterial species,Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that is capable of enzymatic U(VI) reduction. U60 was reduced byS. oneidensisin the absence of O2, but the reduction kinetics for U60 were significantly slower than was observed in this study for aqueous uranyl acetate, and were faster than was reported in previous studies for solid phase U(VI). Our results indicate that U60 aggregates bigger than 0.2 μm formed immediately upon mixing with the bacterial growth medium, and that these aggregates were gradually broken down during the process of reduction. Neither reduction nor dissolution of U60 was observed during 72 h of control experiments open to the atmosphere, indicating that the breakdown and dissolution of U60 aggregates is caused by the reduction of U60, and thatS. oneidensisis capable of direct reduction of the U(VI) within the U60 nanoclusters, likely due to the adsorption of U60 aggregates onto bacterial cells. This study is first to show the reduction capacity of bacteria for uranyl peroxide nanoclusters, and the results yield a better understanding of the long term fate of uranium in environmental systems in which uranyl peroxide nanoclusters are present.},
doi = {10.1515/ract-2017-2759},
journal = {Radiochimica Acta},
number = 1,
volume = 106,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Fri Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}