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Title: Modeling and simulation of CO 2 capture using semipermeable elastic microcapsules

Abstract

Very high rates of CO2 absorption have been demonstrated using semipermeable microcapsules filled with environmentally benign sodium carbonate solutions (Vericella et al., Nature communications 6, 2015). However, such capsules have also exhibited several traits, including water loss/uptake, elastic swelling and buckling, and precipitation of solids, which make them more complicated to engineer as a carbon capture material. To address this, a mechanistic model for mass transfer and chemical reaction has been developed, which accounts for these behaviors, and can be used as a predictive tool to explore capsule performance under different CO2 capture scenarios. The model uses a modified film theory to describe CO2 and H2O mass transfer rates, a concentration based description of vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium inside the capsule, and an elastic description of the capsule shell. Model predictions compare favorably to literature data for precipitating carbonates, as well as recent data for microcapsule CO2 absorption. The model was used to assess practical issues of capsule water transfer during a temperature swing CO2 absorption/desorption cycle. Model predictions indicate that capsules filled with high weight percent, precipitating sodium carbonate solution could be significantly or completely dehydrated during CO2 absorption. Subsequent rehydration of lean capsules at elevated temperature showed strong sensitivity tomore » both gas humidity, and capsule shell elasticity.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1466230
Report Number(s):
NETL-DOE-21633
Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836; PII: S1750583618300215
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; CO2 Capture, Elastic Microcapsule, CFD Modeling

Citation Formats

Finn, Justin R., and Galvin, Janine E. Modeling and simulation of CO 2 capture using semipermeable elastic microcapsules. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.04.022.
Finn, Justin R., & Galvin, Janine E. Modeling and simulation of CO 2 capture using semipermeable elastic microcapsules. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.04.022.
Finn, Justin R., and Galvin, Janine E. Sun . "Modeling and simulation of CO 2 capture using semipermeable elastic microcapsules". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.04.022. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466230.
@article{osti_1466230,
title = {Modeling and simulation of CO 2 capture using semipermeable elastic microcapsules},
author = {Finn, Justin R. and Galvin, Janine E.},
abstractNote = {Very high rates of CO2 absorption have been demonstrated using semipermeable microcapsules filled with environmentally benign sodium carbonate solutions (Vericella et al., Nature communications 6, 2015). However, such capsules have also exhibited several traits, including water loss/uptake, elastic swelling and buckling, and precipitation of solids, which make them more complicated to engineer as a carbon capture material. To address this, a mechanistic model for mass transfer and chemical reaction has been developed, which accounts for these behaviors, and can be used as a predictive tool to explore capsule performance under different CO2 capture scenarios. The model uses a modified film theory to describe CO2 and H2O mass transfer rates, a concentration based description of vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium inside the capsule, and an elastic description of the capsule shell. Model predictions compare favorably to literature data for precipitating carbonates, as well as recent data for microcapsule CO2 absorption. The model was used to assess practical issues of capsule water transfer during a temperature swing CO2 absorption/desorption cycle. Model predictions indicate that capsules filled with high weight percent, precipitating sodium carbonate solution could be significantly or completely dehydrated during CO2 absorption. Subsequent rehydration of lean capsules at elevated temperature showed strong sensitivity to both gas humidity, and capsule shell elasticity.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2018.04.022},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
issn = {1750-5836},
number = C,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}