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Title: Permeability, porosity, and mineral surface area changes in basalt cores induced by reactive transport of CO 2-rich brine

Abstract

Four reactive flow–through laboratory experiments (two each at 0.1 mL/min and 0.01 mL/min flow rates) at 150°C and 150 bar (15 MPa) are conducted on intact basalt cores to assess changes in porosity, permeability, and surface area caused by CO 2–rich fluid–rock interaction. Permeability decreases slightly during the lower flow rate experiments and increases during the higher flow rate experiments. At the higher flow rate, core permeability increases by more than one order of magnitude in one experiment and less than a factor of two in the other due to differences in preexisting flow path structure. X–ray computed tomography (XRCT) scans of pre– and post–experiment cores identify both mineral dissolution and secondary mineralization, with a net decrease in XRCT porosity of ~0.7%–0.8% for the larger pores in all four cores. (Ultra) small–angle neutron scattering ((U)SANS) data sets indicate an increase in both (U)SANS porosity and specific surface area (SSA) over the ~1 nm to 10 µm scale range in post–experiment basalt samples, with differences due to flow rate and reaction time. Net porosity increases from summing porosity changes from XRCT and (U)SANS analyses are consistent with core mass decreases. (U)SANS data suggest an overall preservation of the pore structure withmore » no change in mineral surface roughness from reaction, and the pore structure is unique in comparison to previously published basalt analyses. Altogether, these data sets illustrate changes in physical parameters that arise due to fluid–basalt interaction in relatively low pH environments with elevated CO 2 concentration, with significant implications for flow, transport, and reaction through geologic formations.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [3];  [5]
  1. New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)
  3. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
  4. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
  5. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); ETH-Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1466025
Grant/Contract Number:  
EE0002764
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; permeability; porosity; surface area; reactive transport; (ultra) small‐angle neutron scattering ((U)SANS); X-ray computed tomography (XRCT)

Citation Formats

Luhmann, Andrew J., Tutolo, Benjamin M., Bagley, Brian C., Mildner, David F. R., Seyfried, Jr., William E., and Saar, Martin O.. Permeability, porosity, and mineral surface area changes in basalt cores induced by reactive transport of CO2-rich brine. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016WR019216.
Luhmann, Andrew J., Tutolo, Benjamin M., Bagley, Brian C., Mildner, David F. R., Seyfried, Jr., William E., & Saar, Martin O.. Permeability, porosity, and mineral surface area changes in basalt cores induced by reactive transport of CO2-rich brine. United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR019216.
Luhmann, Andrew J., Tutolo, Benjamin M., Bagley, Brian C., Mildner, David F. R., Seyfried, Jr., William E., and Saar, Martin O.. Tue . "Permeability, porosity, and mineral surface area changes in basalt cores induced by reactive transport of CO2-rich brine". United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR019216. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466025.
@article{osti_1466025,
title = {Permeability, porosity, and mineral surface area changes in basalt cores induced by reactive transport of CO2-rich brine},
author = {Luhmann, Andrew J. and Tutolo, Benjamin M. and Bagley, Brian C. and Mildner, David F. R. and Seyfried, Jr., William E. and Saar, Martin O.},
abstractNote = {Four reactive flow–through laboratory experiments (two each at 0.1 mL/min and 0.01 mL/min flow rates) at 150°C and 150 bar (15 MPa) are conducted on intact basalt cores to assess changes in porosity, permeability, and surface area caused by CO2–rich fluid–rock interaction. Permeability decreases slightly during the lower flow rate experiments and increases during the higher flow rate experiments. At the higher flow rate, core permeability increases by more than one order of magnitude in one experiment and less than a factor of two in the other due to differences in preexisting flow path structure. X–ray computed tomography (XRCT) scans of pre– and post–experiment cores identify both mineral dissolution and secondary mineralization, with a net decrease in XRCT porosity of ~0.7%–0.8% for the larger pores in all four cores. (Ultra) small–angle neutron scattering ((U)SANS) data sets indicate an increase in both (U)SANS porosity and specific surface area (SSA) over the ~1 nm to 10 µm scale range in post–experiment basalt samples, with differences due to flow rate and reaction time. Net porosity increases from summing porosity changes from XRCT and (U)SANS analyses are consistent with core mass decreases. (U)SANS data suggest an overall preservation of the pore structure with no change in mineral surface roughness from reaction, and the pore structure is unique in comparison to previously published basalt analyses. Altogether, these data sets illustrate changes in physical parameters that arise due to fluid–basalt interaction in relatively low pH environments with elevated CO2 concentration, with significant implications for flow, transport, and reaction through geologic formations.},
doi = {10.1002/2016WR019216},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 3,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 07 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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