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Title: Sun Grant/DOE Regional Feedstock Partnership: Final Technical Report

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Sun Grant Initiative initiated the Regional Feedstock Partnership (referred to as the Partnership) in 2007 primarily to address information gaps associated with the likelihood for realization of the sustainable and reliable production of a billion-tons of biomass annually to support the U.S. bioenergy industry by the year 2030. Publication of The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (Perlack et al., 2005) in 2005, with its associated yield assumptions, led to the realization that the yield goals and assumptions utilized in that analysis required careful validation. To achieve the overall goal of validating key yield assumptions, the following objectives were developed: 1. Establishment of replicated field trials across regions to determine the impact of crop residue removal (primarily corn and small grains) on future grain yields and soil health. 2. Establishment of replicated field trials of some of the most promising dedicated energy crops (herbaceous annuals and perennials, as well as woody perennials) to demonstrate the potential performance of these feedstocks across the U.S. 3. Assessment of feedstock resources to be used to estimate a sustainable national supply potential. Teams composed of representatives from Land Grant Universities, USDA ARS, DOE National Laboratories,more » industry, and other federal agencies were identified and assembled to address each of these objectives. For Objective 1, members of the USDA ARS’ Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP) team combined with university personnel to leverage on-going work and established new trials to determine sustainable corn residue removal rates. In addition, universities across the continental U.S. conducted surveys of published past research to define parameters for the use of cereal grain residue (primarily wheat) as a biomass feedstock. For Objective 2, and based on input from DOE, USDA, Land Grant university scientists, and others, several herbaceous and woody energy crop species were selected for new or further evaluation across wide geographic areas as cellulosic feedstock sources. Species teams were organized to assess the yield potential of candidate herbaceous feedstocks including sorghum, energycane, Miscanthus x giganteus (hereafter referred to as miscanthus), switchgrass, and mixed perennial species (primarily grasses and some legumes) on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land. Woody species will be critical components of the bioenergy sector; therefore, species teams were also organized for shrub willow and hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Field trials of each species were utilized to determine yield potential across the U.S. For Objective 3, a GIS resource team was organized with representatives from each of the five Sun Grant regions. While some regional assessments were made, the multi-institutional team decided that the group from Oregon State University would utilize their PRISM ELM model to estimate national yield potential of the various species evaluated. The following are key outcomes and impacts • The Partnership demonstrated the production potential of diverse herbaceous and woody feedstocks across much of the U.S. for 5-7 consecutive growing seasons. Long-term studies such as this are not commonly possible due to limitations in funding cycles. • Long-term field trials were valuable in demonstrating the importance of agronomic management practices and genetic resources to yield of sorghum, switchgrass, miscanthus, energycane, CRP mixed perennial grasses, poplar, and willow. • National yield potential maps were developed for all species evaluated in the Partnership. • Sustainable corn stover removal rates were quantified for use by producers, harvesters, and commercial lignocellulosic biorefineries. • Data from the Partnership field trials not only validated initial Billion Ton estimates, but were instrumental in developing both the Billion Ton Update in 2011, and especially the 2016 Billion Ton Report. • The Partnership provided the opportunity to assemble and conserve a poplar germplasm collection that contains more than 20,000 clones for use in breeding programs. New clones resulting from crosses made using this germplasm collection have resulted in significantly improved cultivars that could be scaled up and deployed. • Further validation of improved yields of new varieties/cultivars of biomass sorghum, energycane, hybrid poplars, and shrub willows was produced by the Partnership. • The Partnership demonstrated the potential of energycane in northern parts of the southeastern U.S., particularly in relation to sugarcane varieties. • For certain feedstocks (e.g., CRP mixed grasses, switchgrass, willow, and poplar), production economics were ascertained through Partnership field trials. • Biomass samples collected as part of the Partnership are also being used to populate Idaho National Laboratory’s Bioenergy Feedstock Library. • Because of the size and scope of the Partnership, workforce development was a key component and outcome. Numerous undergraduate students (25), graduate students (15 MS and 8 PhD), and postdoctoral researchers (7) were trained by Partnership participants. This will help to prepare individuals for careers in the emerging fields of plant breeding, biomass production, feedstock supply logistics, and biomass conversion processes. • More than 130 scientific publications have been authored by Partnership team members. Numerous other presentations, outreach publications, book chapters, and websites have also been developed to further the continued development of the bioeconomy.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1463330
Report Number(s):
DOE-SDSU-85041
DOE Contract Number:  
FC36-05GO85041
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Regional Feedstock Partnership; Billion Ton; Biomass; Bioenergy Feedstocks; National Yield Potential Maps

Citation Formats

Owens, Vance N. Sun Grant/DOE Regional Feedstock Partnership: Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1463330.
Owens, Vance N. Sun Grant/DOE Regional Feedstock Partnership: Final Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1463330.
Owens, Vance N. Thu . "Sun Grant/DOE Regional Feedstock Partnership: Final Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1463330. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1463330.
@article{osti_1463330,
title = {Sun Grant/DOE Regional Feedstock Partnership: Final Technical Report},
author = {Owens, Vance N.},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Sun Grant Initiative initiated the Regional Feedstock Partnership (referred to as the Partnership) in 2007 primarily to address information gaps associated with the likelihood for realization of the sustainable and reliable production of a billion-tons of biomass annually to support the U.S. bioenergy industry by the year 2030. Publication of The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (Perlack et al., 2005) in 2005, with its associated yield assumptions, led to the realization that the yield goals and assumptions utilized in that analysis required careful validation. To achieve the overall goal of validating key yield assumptions, the following objectives were developed: 1. Establishment of replicated field trials across regions to determine the impact of crop residue removal (primarily corn and small grains) on future grain yields and soil health. 2. Establishment of replicated field trials of some of the most promising dedicated energy crops (herbaceous annuals and perennials, as well as woody perennials) to demonstrate the potential performance of these feedstocks across the U.S. 3. Assessment of feedstock resources to be used to estimate a sustainable national supply potential. Teams composed of representatives from Land Grant Universities, USDA ARS, DOE National Laboratories, industry, and other federal agencies were identified and assembled to address each of these objectives. For Objective 1, members of the USDA ARS’ Resilient Economic Agricultural Practices (REAP) team combined with university personnel to leverage on-going work and established new trials to determine sustainable corn residue removal rates. In addition, universities across the continental U.S. conducted surveys of published past research to define parameters for the use of cereal grain residue (primarily wheat) as a biomass feedstock. For Objective 2, and based on input from DOE, USDA, Land Grant university scientists, and others, several herbaceous and woody energy crop species were selected for new or further evaluation across wide geographic areas as cellulosic feedstock sources. Species teams were organized to assess the yield potential of candidate herbaceous feedstocks including sorghum, energycane, Miscanthus x giganteus (hereafter referred to as miscanthus), switchgrass, and mixed perennial species (primarily grasses and some legumes) on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land. Woody species will be critical components of the bioenergy sector; therefore, species teams were also organized for shrub willow and hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Field trials of each species were utilized to determine yield potential across the U.S. For Objective 3, a GIS resource team was organized with representatives from each of the five Sun Grant regions. While some regional assessments were made, the multi-institutional team decided that the group from Oregon State University would utilize their PRISM ELM model to estimate national yield potential of the various species evaluated. The following are key outcomes and impacts • The Partnership demonstrated the production potential of diverse herbaceous and woody feedstocks across much of the U.S. for 5-7 consecutive growing seasons. Long-term studies such as this are not commonly possible due to limitations in funding cycles. • Long-term field trials were valuable in demonstrating the importance of agronomic management practices and genetic resources to yield of sorghum, switchgrass, miscanthus, energycane, CRP mixed perennial grasses, poplar, and willow. • National yield potential maps were developed for all species evaluated in the Partnership. • Sustainable corn stover removal rates were quantified for use by producers, harvesters, and commercial lignocellulosic biorefineries. • Data from the Partnership field trials not only validated initial Billion Ton estimates, but were instrumental in developing both the Billion Ton Update in 2011, and especially the 2016 Billion Ton Report. • The Partnership provided the opportunity to assemble and conserve a poplar germplasm collection that contains more than 20,000 clones for use in breeding programs. New clones resulting from crosses made using this germplasm collection have resulted in significantly improved cultivars that could be scaled up and deployed. • Further validation of improved yields of new varieties/cultivars of biomass sorghum, energycane, hybrid poplars, and shrub willows was produced by the Partnership. • The Partnership demonstrated the potential of energycane in northern parts of the southeastern U.S., particularly in relation to sugarcane varieties. • For certain feedstocks (e.g., CRP mixed grasses, switchgrass, willow, and poplar), production economics were ascertained through Partnership field trials. • Biomass samples collected as part of the Partnership are also being used to populate Idaho National Laboratory’s Bioenergy Feedstock Library. • Because of the size and scope of the Partnership, workforce development was a key component and outcome. Numerous undergraduate students (25), graduate students (15 MS and 8 PhD), and postdoctoral researchers (7) were trained by Partnership participants. This will help to prepare individuals for careers in the emerging fields of plant breeding, biomass production, feedstock supply logistics, and biomass conversion processes. • More than 130 scientific publications have been authored by Partnership team members. Numerous other presentations, outreach publications, book chapters, and websites have also been developed to further the continued development of the bioeconomy.},
doi = {10.2172/1463330},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}