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Title: Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels

Abstract

The thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo dispersion and monolithic fuel has been investigated experimentally and compared to theoretical models. During in-pile irradiation, the thermal conductivity of fresh dispersion fuel at a temperature of 150°C decreases from 59 W/m ·K down to 18  W/m ·K at a burn-up of 4.9 ·10 21 f/cc and further down to 9 W/m·K at a burn-up of 6.1·10 21 f/cc. Fresh monolithic fuel has a considerably lower thermal conductivity of 15 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C and consequently its decrease during in-pile irradiation is less steep as for the dispersion fuel. For a burn-up of 3.5·10 21 f /cc of monolithic fuel 11 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C has been measured by Burkes et al. The difference of the decrease of both fuels originates from effects in the matrix that occur during irradiation, like for dispersion fuel the gradual disappearance of the Al matrix with increasing burn-up and the subsequent growth of an interaction layer (IDL) between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix and subsequent matrix hardening. The growth of fission gas bubbles and the decomposition of the U-Mo crystal lattice affects both dispersion and monolithic fuel.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1455275
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125747
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115; 453060032
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 503; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Uranium-Molybdenum; thermal properties; irradiated; nuclear fuel

Citation Formats

Huber, Tanja K., Breitkreutz, Harald, Burkes, Douglas E., Casella, Amanda J., Casella, Andrew M., Elgeti, Stefan, Reiter, Christian, Robinson, Adam. B., Smith, Frances. N., Wachs, Daniel. M., and Petry, Winfried. Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.056.
Huber, Tanja K., Breitkreutz, Harald, Burkes, Douglas E., Casella, Amanda J., Casella, Andrew M., Elgeti, Stefan, Reiter, Christian, Robinson, Adam. B., Smith, Frances. N., Wachs, Daniel. M., & Petry, Winfried. Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.056.
Huber, Tanja K., Breitkreutz, Harald, Burkes, Douglas E., Casella, Amanda J., Casella, Andrew M., Elgeti, Stefan, Reiter, Christian, Robinson, Adam. B., Smith, Frances. N., Wachs, Daniel. M., and Petry, Winfried. Tue . "Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.056.
@article{osti_1455275,
title = {Thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo fuels},
author = {Huber, Tanja K. and Breitkreutz, Harald and Burkes, Douglas E. and Casella, Amanda J. and Casella, Andrew M. and Elgeti, Stefan and Reiter, Christian and Robinson, Adam. B. and Smith, Frances. N. and Wachs, Daniel. M. and Petry, Winfried},
abstractNote = {The thermal conductivity of fresh and irradiated U-Mo dispersion and monolithic fuel has been investigated experimentally and compared to theoretical models. During in-pile irradiation, the thermal conductivity of fresh dispersion fuel at a temperature of 150°C decreases from 59 W/m ·K down to 18  W/m ·K at a burn-up of 4.9 ·1021 f/cc and further down to 9 W/m·K at a burn-up of 6.1·1021 f/cc. Fresh monolithic fuel has a considerably lower thermal conductivity of 15 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C and consequently its decrease during in-pile irradiation is less steep as for the dispersion fuel. For a burn-up of 3.5·1021 f /cc of monolithic fuel 11 W/m·K at a temperature of 150 °C has been measured by Burkes et al. The difference of the decrease of both fuels originates from effects in the matrix that occur during irradiation, like for dispersion fuel the gradual disappearance of the Al matrix with increasing burn-up and the subsequent growth of an interaction layer (IDL) between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix and subsequent matrix hardening. The growth of fission gas bubbles and the decomposition of the U-Mo crystal lattice affects both dispersion and monolithic fuel.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.056},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
issn = {0022-3115},
number = C,
volume = 503,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}