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Title: It Takes a Village: Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research

Abstract

Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research Science, especially large-scale basic research, is a collaborative endeavor, often drawing on the skills of people from a wide variety of disciplines. These people include not just scientists, but also administrators, engineers, and many others. Fermilab, a Department of Energy National Laboratory and the United States’ premier particle physics laboratory, exemplifies this kind of research; many of its high-energy physics experiments involve hundreds of collaborators from all over the world. The Fermilab Archives seeks to document the history of the lab and the unique scientific research its staff and visitors perform. Adequately documenting the lab’s work often requires us to go far beyond things like the writings and correspondence of scientists to also capture the administrative and social histories of the experiments and the context in which they were performed. At Fermilab, we have sought to capture these elements of the lab’s activities through an oral history program that focuses on support staff as well as physicists and collection development choices that recognize the importance of records documenting the cultural life of the lab. These materials are not merely supplementary, but rather essential documentation of the many types of labor thatmore » go into the planning and execution of an experiment or the construction of an accelerator and the context in which this work is performed. Any picture of these experiments and accelerators that did not include this type of information would be incomplete. While the importance and richness of this material is especially pronounced at Fermilab due to the massive size of its experiments and accelerator facilities and its vibrant cultural life, the fruitfulness of these collecting efforts at Fermilab suggests that other archives documenting modern STEM research should also make sure the contributions of non-technical and non-scientific staff are preserved and that researchers interested in this subject should not neglect such sources.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1438530
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-18-095-CD
1674441
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Higgins, Valerie. It Takes a Village: Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Higgins, Valerie. It Takes a Village: Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research. United States.
Higgins, Valerie. Sun . "It Takes a Village: Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1438530.
@article{osti_1438530,
title = {It Takes a Village: Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research},
author = {Higgins, Valerie},
abstractNote = {Documenting the Contributions of Non-Scientific Staff to Scientific Research Science, especially large-scale basic research, is a collaborative endeavor, often drawing on the skills of people from a wide variety of disciplines. These people include not just scientists, but also administrators, engineers, and many others. Fermilab, a Department of Energy National Laboratory and the United States’ premier particle physics laboratory, exemplifies this kind of research; many of its high-energy physics experiments involve hundreds of collaborators from all over the world. The Fermilab Archives seeks to document the history of the lab and the unique scientific research its staff and visitors perform. Adequately documenting the lab’s work often requires us to go far beyond things like the writings and correspondence of scientists to also capture the administrative and social histories of the experiments and the context in which they were performed. At Fermilab, we have sought to capture these elements of the lab’s activities through an oral history program that focuses on support staff as well as physicists and collection development choices that recognize the importance of records documenting the cultural life of the lab. These materials are not merely supplementary, but rather essential documentation of the many types of labor that go into the planning and execution of an experiment or the construction of an accelerator and the context in which this work is performed. Any picture of these experiments and accelerators that did not include this type of information would be incomplete. While the importance and richness of this material is especially pronounced at Fermilab due to the massive size of its experiments and accelerator facilities and its vibrant cultural life, the fruitfulness of these collecting efforts at Fermilab suggests that other archives documenting modern STEM research should also make sure the contributions of non-technical and non-scientific staff are preserved and that researchers interested in this subject should not neglect such sources.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}

Conference:
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