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Title: Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies

Abstract

Cities generate 70% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, a fraction that is grow-ing with global urbanization. While cities play an important role in climate change mitigation, there has been little focus on reducing urban methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we develop a conceptual framework for CH 4 mitigation in cities by describing emission processes, the role of measurements, and a need for new institutional partnerships. Urban CH 4 emissions are likely to grow with expanding use of natural gas and organic waste disposal systems in growing population centers; however, we currently lack the ability to quantify this increase. We also lack systematic knowledge of the relative contribution of these distinct source sectors on emissions. We present new observations from four North American cities to demonstrate that CH4 emissions vary in magnitude and sector from city to city and hence require different mitigation strategies. Detections of fugitive emissions from these systems suggest that current mitiga- tion approaches are absent or ineffective. These findings illustrate that tackling urban CH 4 emissions will require research efforts to identify mitigation targets, develop and implement new mitigation strategies, and monitor atmospheric CH 4 levels to ensure the success of mitigation efforts. This research will require amore » variety of techniques to achieve these objectives and should be deployed in cities globally. In conclusion, we suggest that metropolitan scale partnerships may effectively coordinate systematic measurements and actions focused on emission reduction goals.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth System Science; California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), La Canada Flintridge, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
  2. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Biology; Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Global Change and Sustainability Center
  3. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Biology
  4. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), La Canada Flintridge, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
  5. San Diego State Univ., San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Biology
  6. California Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA (United States). Monitoring and Laboratory Division
  7. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Environmental Science
  8. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth System Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1436409
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0005266
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth's Future
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 2328-4277
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; urban; greenhouse gas; fugitive; fossil; biogenic; mobile

Citation Formats

Hopkins, Francesca M., Ehleringer, James R., Bush, Susan E., Duren, Riley M., Miller, Charles E., Lai, Chun-Ta, Hsu, Ying-Kuang, Carranza, Valerie, and Randerson, James T.. Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016EF000381.
Hopkins, Francesca M., Ehleringer, James R., Bush, Susan E., Duren, Riley M., Miller, Charles E., Lai, Chun-Ta, Hsu, Ying-Kuang, Carranza, Valerie, & Randerson, James T.. Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies. United States. doi:10.1002/2016EF000381.
Hopkins, Francesca M., Ehleringer, James R., Bush, Susan E., Duren, Riley M., Miller, Charles E., Lai, Chun-Ta, Hsu, Ying-Kuang, Carranza, Valerie, and Randerson, James T.. Sat . "Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies". United States. doi:10.1002/2016EF000381. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1436409.
@article{osti_1436409,
title = {Mitigation of methane emissions in cities: How new measurements and partnerships can contribute to emissions reduction strategies},
author = {Hopkins, Francesca M. and Ehleringer, James R. and Bush, Susan E. and Duren, Riley M. and Miller, Charles E. and Lai, Chun-Ta and Hsu, Ying-Kuang and Carranza, Valerie and Randerson, James T.},
abstractNote = {Cities generate 70% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, a fraction that is grow-ing with global urbanization. While cities play an important role in climate change mitigation, there has been little focus on reducing urban methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we develop a conceptual framework for CH4 mitigation in cities by describing emission processes, the role of measurements, and a need for new institutional partnerships. Urban CH4 emissions are likely to grow with expanding use of natural gas and organic waste disposal systems in growing population centers; however, we currently lack the ability to quantify this increase. We also lack systematic knowledge of the relative contribution of these distinct source sectors on emissions. We present new observations from four North American cities to demonstrate that CH4 emissions vary in magnitude and sector from city to city and hence require different mitigation strategies. Detections of fugitive emissions from these systems suggest that current mitiga- tion approaches are absent or ineffective. These findings illustrate that tackling urban CH4 emissions will require research efforts to identify mitigation targets, develop and implement new mitigation strategies, and monitor atmospheric CH4 levels to ensure the success of mitigation efforts. This research will require a variety of techniques to achieve these objectives and should be deployed in cities globally. In conclusion, we suggest that metropolitan scale partnerships may effectively coordinate systematic measurements and actions focused on emission reduction goals.},
doi = {10.1002/2016EF000381},
journal = {Earth's Future},
issn = {2328-4277},
number = 9,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {9}
}

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Cited by: 3 works
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Works referenced in this record:

A cavity ring-down analyzer for measuring atmospheric levels of methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor
journal, August 2008