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Title: Compressive and Tensile Strength of Class H Cement Exposed to High Pressure and Temperature Storage Conditions

Abstract

NRAP TRS

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory - Energy Data eXchange; NETL
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1433146
Report Number(s):
2478a7e7-62e4-4b5a-a609-9367e3ec16ef
DOE Contract Number:
1022407
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Figures/Plots
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
TRS

Citation Formats

Robert Dilmore. Compressive and Tensile Strength of Class H Cement Exposed to High Pressure and Temperature Storage Conditions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18141/1433146.
Robert Dilmore. Compressive and Tensile Strength of Class H Cement Exposed to High Pressure and Temperature Storage Conditions. United States. doi:10.18141/1433146.
Robert Dilmore. Tue . "Compressive and Tensile Strength of Class H Cement Exposed to High Pressure and Temperature Storage Conditions". United States. doi:10.18141/1433146. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1433146.
@article{osti_1433146,
title = {Compressive and Tensile Strength of Class H Cement Exposed to High Pressure and Temperature Storage Conditions},
author = {Robert Dilmore},
abstractNote = {NRAP TRS},
doi = {10.18141/1433146},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Dataset:

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  • To cement deep oil wells and high-temperature geothermal wells, special cements with superior cementing properties, hardening characteristics, and durability under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions are required. Therefore, the authors have been accumulating technical data on a special cement consisting of 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/ and silica. In this paper, strength development at 290 to 842/sup 0/F (143 to 450/sup 0/C) was investigated for the mixtures of three 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/ modifications (..gamma.., ..beta.., and ..cap alpha..) and quartz. Various analyses were carried out on hardened specimens and the mechanism of hydrothermal reaction for these mixtures is discussed. Within the limits of this experiment,more » the authors conclude that the strength of 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/-quartz mixtures depends on 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/ modifications, curing temperature, and curing time, but the influences of curing pressure and increasing rate of temperature are relatively minor. Moreover, they assume that the difference of reaction rate of 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/ and quartz, the type of hydration products, and the producing conditions will result in the difference of strength, depending on 2CaO/SiO/sub 2/ modification.« less
  • Under deep oil-well conditions of elevated temperature and pressure, crystalline calcium silicate hydrates are formed during Portland cement hydration. The use of silica rich mineral additives leads to the formation of crystalline hydrates with better mechanical properties than those formed without the additive. The effects of silica flour, silica fume (amorphous silica), and a natural zeolite mixture on the hydration of Class H cement slurries at 180 C under externally applied pressures of 7 and 52 MPa are examined in real time using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. For some compositions examined, but not all, pressure was found to have amore » large effect on the kinetics of crystalline hydrate formation. The use of silica fume delayed both C{sub 3}S hydration and the formation of crystalline silicate hydrates compared to what was seen with other silica sources.« less
  • Under deep oil-well conditions of elevated temperature and pressure, crystalline calcium silicate hydrates are formed during Portland cement hydration. The use of silica rich mineral additives leads to the formation of crystalline hydrates with better mechanical properties than those formed without the additive. The effects of silica flour, silica fume (amorphous silica), and a natural zeolite mixture on the hydration of Class H cement slurries at 180 deg. C under externally applied pressures of 7 and 52 MPa are examined in real time using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. For some compositions examined, but not all, pressure was found to havemore » a large effect on the kinetics of crystalline hydrate formation. The use of silica fume delayed both C{sub 3}S hydration and the formation of crystalline silicate hydrates compared to what was seen with other silica sources.« less