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Title: Studying Military Community Health, Well-being, and Discourse through the Social Media Lens

Abstract

Social media can provide a resource for characterizing communities and targeted populations through activities and content shared online. For instance, studying the armed forces’ use of social media may provide insights into their health and wellbeing. In this paper, we address three broad research questions: (1) How do military populations use social media? (2) What topics do military users discuss in social media? (3) Do military users talk about health and well-being differently than civilians? Military Twitter users were identified through keywords in the profile description of users who posted geotagged tweets at military installations. These military tweets were compared with the tweets from remaining population. Our analysis indicate that military users talk more about military related responsibilities and events, whereas non-military users talk more about school, work, and leisure activities. A significant difference in online content generated by both populations was identified, involving sentiment, health, language, and social media features.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1431410
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119954
400904120
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Public Health Intelligence and the Internet. Lecture Notes in Social Networks, 87-105
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
ocial media analytics; sentiment analysis; well-being; healthcare analytics

Citation Formats

Pavalanathan, Umashanthi, Datla, Vivek V., Volkova, Svitlana, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., Pirrung, Megan A., Harrison, Joshua J., Chappell, Alan R., and Corley, Courtney D. Studying Military Community Health, Well-being, and Discourse through the Social Media Lens. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-68604-2_6.
Pavalanathan, Umashanthi, Datla, Vivek V., Volkova, Svitlana, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., Pirrung, Megan A., Harrison, Joshua J., Chappell, Alan R., & Corley, Courtney D. Studying Military Community Health, Well-being, and Discourse through the Social Media Lens. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-68604-2_6.
Pavalanathan, Umashanthi, Datla, Vivek V., Volkova, Svitlana, Charles-Smith, Lauren E., Pirrung, Megan A., Harrison, Joshua J., Chappell, Alan R., and Corley, Courtney D. Fri . "Studying Military Community Health, Well-being, and Discourse through the Social Media Lens". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-68604-2_6.
@article{osti_1431410,
title = {Studying Military Community Health, Well-being, and Discourse through the Social Media Lens},
author = {Pavalanathan, Umashanthi and Datla, Vivek V. and Volkova, Svitlana and Charles-Smith, Lauren E. and Pirrung, Megan A. and Harrison, Joshua J. and Chappell, Alan R. and Corley, Courtney D.},
abstractNote = {Social media can provide a resource for characterizing communities and targeted populations through activities and content shared online. For instance, studying the armed forces’ use of social media may provide insights into their health and wellbeing. In this paper, we address three broad research questions: (1) How do military populations use social media? (2) What topics do military users discuss in social media? (3) Do military users talk about health and well-being differently than civilians? Military Twitter users were identified through keywords in the profile description of users who posted geotagged tweets at military installations. These military tweets were compared with the tweets from remaining population. Our analysis indicate that military users talk more about military related responsibilities and events, whereas non-military users talk more about school, work, and leisure activities. A significant difference in online content generated by both populations was identified, involving sentiment, health, language, and social media features.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-68604-2_6},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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