skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Additive Manufacturing – A New Challenge for Automation and Robotics

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) is a rapidly growing technology descended from the first stereolithography systems. AM describes a variety of material deposition technologies for forming objects in a digital manner layer-by-layer under computer control. Now commonly known as 3D printing, AM quickly branched out into several key directions – material extrusion, sheet lamination, direct energy deposition, vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, binder jetting, and material jetting. The common factor in all AM branches is a foundation in robotics and automation. While most of the mechanical 3D printing structures are based on simple gantry systems, there are Gough-Stewart platforms and, more recently, six or more DoF manipulator-based systems that have been developed. Currently available commercial systems are based on open-loop control with minimum sensing capabilities; the latest systems in development are starting to take advantage of complex feedback loops and layers of advanced sensing and data logging. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory is leading the efforts in applying advanced robotics in the creation of large-scale 3D printers. The recent demonstration of an additively manufactured excavator at the CONEXPO 2017 exhibition in Las Vegas showed that the use of cutting edge robotics and automation is essential for the nextmore » generation of additive systems. The future of AM will heavily rely on advanced robotics, machine learning, and the internet of things. This paper summarizes progress in AM; presents the practical aspects, challenges, and lessons learned in developing robotic-based AM systems; and outlines the needs and future directions of robotics for AM.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. Research Institute for Automation and Measurements
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1430606
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 743; Conference: Automation 2018 - Warsaw, , Poland - 3/21/2018 4:00:00 AM-3/23/2018 4:00:00 AM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark W., and Cader, Maciej. Additive Manufacturing – A New Challenge for Automation and Robotics. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-77179-3_1.
Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark W., & Cader, Maciej. Additive Manufacturing – A New Challenge for Automation and Robotics. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-77179-3_1.
Nycz, Andrzej, Noakes, Mark W., and Cader, Maciej. Thu . "Additive Manufacturing – A New Challenge for Automation and Robotics". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-77179-3_1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1430606.
@article{osti_1430606,
title = {Additive Manufacturing – A New Challenge for Automation and Robotics},
author = {Nycz, Andrzej and Noakes, Mark W. and Cader, Maciej},
abstractNote = {Additive manufacturing (AM) is a rapidly growing technology descended from the first stereolithography systems. AM describes a variety of material deposition technologies for forming objects in a digital manner layer-by-layer under computer control. Now commonly known as 3D printing, AM quickly branched out into several key directions – material extrusion, sheet lamination, direct energy deposition, vat polymerization, powder bed fusion, binder jetting, and material jetting. The common factor in all AM branches is a foundation in robotics and automation. While most of the mechanical 3D printing structures are based on simple gantry systems, there are Gough-Stewart platforms and, more recently, six or more DoF manipulator-based systems that have been developed. Currently available commercial systems are based on open-loop control with minimum sensing capabilities; the latest systems in development are starting to take advantage of complex feedback loops and layers of advanced sensing and data logging. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility of Oak Ridge National Laboratory is leading the efforts in applying advanced robotics in the creation of large-scale 3D printers. The recent demonstration of an additively manufactured excavator at the CONEXPO 2017 exhibition in Las Vegas showed that the use of cutting edge robotics and automation is essential for the next generation of additive systems. The future of AM will heavily rely on advanced robotics, machine learning, and the internet of things. This paper summarizes progress in AM; presents the practical aspects, challenges, and lessons learned in developing robotic-based AM systems; and outlines the needs and future directions of robotics for AM.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-77179-3_1},
journal = {},
issn = {2194--5357},
number = ,
volume = 743,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: