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Title: Spallation Neutron Source Second Target Station Integrated Systems Update

Abstract

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed from the beginning to accommodate both an accelerator upgrade to increase the proton power and a second target station (STS). Four workshops were organized in 2013 and 2014 to identify key science areas and challenges where neutrons will play a vital role [1-4]. Participants concluded that the addition of STS to the existing ORNL neutron sources was needed to complement the strengths of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the SNS first target station (FTS). To address the capability gaps identified in the workshops, a study was undertaken to identify instrument concepts that could provide the required new science capabilities. The study outlined 22 instrument concepts and presented an initial science case for STS [5]. These instrument concepts formed the basis of a planning suite of instruments whose requirements determined an initial site layout and moderator selection. An STS Technical Design Report (TDR) documented the STS concept based on those choices [6]. Since issue of the TDR, the STS concept has significantly matured as described in this document.


Citation Formats

Ankner, John Francis, An, Ke, Blokland, Willem, Charlton, Timothy R., Coates, Leighton, Dayton, Michael J., Dean, Robert A., Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis E., Ehlers, Georg, Gallmeier, Franz X., Graves, Van B., Heller, William T., Holmes, Jeffrey A., Huq, Ashfia, Lumsden, Mark D., McHargue, William M., McManamy, Thomas J., Plum, Michael A., Rajic, Slobodan, Remec, Igor, Robertson, Lee, Sala, Gabriele, Stoica, Alexandru Dan, Trotter, Steven M., Winn, Barry L., Abudureyimu, Reheman, Rennich, Mark J., and Herwig, Kenneth W. Spallation Neutron Source Second Target Station Integrated Systems Update. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1427655.
Ankner, John Francis, An, Ke, Blokland, Willem, Charlton, Timothy R., Coates, Leighton, Dayton, Michael J., Dean, Robert A., Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis E., Ehlers, Georg, Gallmeier, Franz X., Graves, Van B., Heller, William T., Holmes, Jeffrey A., Huq, Ashfia, Lumsden, Mark D., McHargue, William M., McManamy, Thomas J., Plum, Michael A., Rajic, Slobodan, Remec, Igor, Robertson, Lee, Sala, Gabriele, Stoica, Alexandru Dan, Trotter, Steven M., Winn, Barry L., Abudureyimu, Reheman, Rennich, Mark J., & Herwig, Kenneth W. Spallation Neutron Source Second Target Station Integrated Systems Update. United States. doi:10.2172/1427655.
Ankner, John Francis, An, Ke, Blokland, Willem, Charlton, Timothy R., Coates, Leighton, Dayton, Michael J., Dean, Robert A., Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis E., Ehlers, Georg, Gallmeier, Franz X., Graves, Van B., Heller, William T., Holmes, Jeffrey A., Huq, Ashfia, Lumsden, Mark D., McHargue, William M., McManamy, Thomas J., Plum, Michael A., Rajic, Slobodan, Remec, Igor, Robertson, Lee, Sala, Gabriele, Stoica, Alexandru Dan, Trotter, Steven M., Winn, Barry L., Abudureyimu, Reheman, Rennich, Mark J., and Herwig, Kenneth W. Sat . "Spallation Neutron Source Second Target Station Integrated Systems Update". United States. doi:10.2172/1427655. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427655.
@article{osti_1427655,
title = {Spallation Neutron Source Second Target Station Integrated Systems Update},
author = {Ankner, John Francis and An, Ke and Blokland, Willem and Charlton, Timothy R. and Coates, Leighton and Dayton, Michael J. and Dean, Robert A. and Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis E. and Ehlers, Georg and Gallmeier, Franz X. and Graves, Van B. and Heller, William T. and Holmes, Jeffrey A. and Huq, Ashfia and Lumsden, Mark D. and McHargue, William M. and McManamy, Thomas J. and Plum, Michael A. and Rajic, Slobodan and Remec, Igor and Robertson, Lee and Sala, Gabriele and Stoica, Alexandru Dan and Trotter, Steven M. and Winn, Barry L. and Abudureyimu, Reheman and Rennich, Mark J. and Herwig, Kenneth W.},
abstractNote = {The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) was designed from the beginning to accommodate both an accelerator upgrade to increase the proton power and a second target station (STS). Four workshops were organized in 2013 and 2014 to identify key science areas and challenges where neutrons will play a vital role [1-4]. Participants concluded that the addition of STS to the existing ORNL neutron sources was needed to complement the strengths of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the SNS first target station (FTS). To address the capability gaps identified in the workshops, a study was undertaken to identify instrument concepts that could provide the required new science capabilities. The study outlined 22 instrument concepts and presented an initial science case for STS [5]. These instrument concepts formed the basis of a planning suite of instruments whose requirements determined an initial site layout and moderator selection. An STS Technical Design Report (TDR) documented the STS concept based on those choices [6]. Since issue of the TDR, the STS concept has significantly matured as described in this document.},
doi = {10.2172/1427655},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets addedmore » to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.« less
  • The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a major new user facility for materials research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), see the Spallation Neutron Source web site at: www.sns.gov/aboutsns/source/htm. The SNS will operate at a proton beam power of 1.4 MW delivered in short pulses at 60 Hz; this power level is an order of magnitude higher than that of the current most intense pulsed spallation neutron facility in the world, ISIS at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom: 160 kW at 50 Hz. When completed in 2006, themore » SNS will supply the research community with neutron beams of unprecedented intensity and a powerful, diverse instrument suite with exceptional capabilities. Together, these will enable a new generation of experimental studies of interest to chemists, condensed matter physicists, biologists, materials scientists, and engineers, in an ever-increasing range of applications. The Long-Wavelength Target Station (LWTS) complements the High-Power Target Station (HPTS) facility, which is already under construction, and will leverage the significant investment in the remainder of the complex, providing important new scientific opportunities. The fully equipped SNS will offer capabilities for neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of materials with sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range, and speed that are unparalleled in the world.« less
  • This is the final report for a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to design a next-generation spallation source neutron target system for the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos. It has been recognized for some time that new advanced neutron sources are needed in the US if the country is to maintain a competitive position in several important scientific and technological areas. A recent DOE panel concluded that the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (a nuclear reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and a high-powermore » pulsed spallation source are both needed in the near future. One of the most technically challenging designs for a spallation source is the target station itself and, more specifically, the target-moderator-reflector arrangement. Los Alamos has demonstrated capabilities in designing, building, and operating high-power spallation-neutron-source target stations. Most of the new design ideas proposed worldwide for target system design for the next generation pulsed spallation source have either been conceived and implemented at LANSCE or proposed by LANSCE target system designers. These concepts include split targets, flux-trap moderators, back scattering and composite moderators, and composite reflectors.« less
  • The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal,more » and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.« less